What Is Descartes's Method Of Reasoning And Questioning Knowledge?

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Descartes uses a structural method of dissecting and questioning knowledge to establish truth amongst provided information. The introspection into his method begins in part one, when he sets the mental foundation for the proper understanding of real world elements and emphasizes how unreliable reasoning and perspective can be. In part two Descartes, uses personal experiences to demonstrate real world applications of his own method. Lastly, Descartes remains true to his method of reasoning , strengthening it by introducing counter arguments. In part one Descartes , begins his dissection of possessing actual knowledge and using the facets of the mind such as reasoning and analysis to understand what is happening in our world, despite what …show more content…
Sheer quality of intellect doesn’t make the difference between good and bad”. Within Descartes perspective possessing intellectual qualities at the highest level doesn’t mean that a person will be able to apply them correctly to arrive at a conclusion when analyzing information . He explains that it’s more effective for a person to study information at a slower rate using correct principles rather than rushing to understand information using a high intellectual capacity and arriving at the wrong conclusion . The distinction Descartes sets is the foundation for questioning and reasoning things correctly, this distinction is essential in understanding his method of doubt . Furthering the theme of doubting the existing structure of knowledge to arrive at the truth , Descartes mentions underlying issue of accepting historical text at face value without questioning it completely , this further voids actual understanding . “And …show more content…
He creates the next phase of his method by describing two types of people , those who think they know it all and rush to achieve a conclusion and those who have a high intellectual capacity to reason yet accept the opinions of others to remain right. Certain people who think they know it all continue to rise into public office , and create policies influenced by their sense of arrogance , corrupting the minds of the masses. Descartes also mentions the influence of teachers,parents, and academics institutions in shaping the beliefs and horizons of mosts minds and the difficulty of breaking away from it . “ It is almost impossible that our judgments should be as unclouded and as well grounded as they would have been if from the moment of our birth we had had the full use of our reason and had always been guided by it alone” . This explanation covers the second and third phase of the doubt method , which prompts the reader to divide information into a few parts and then begin to organize the facts they understand , which is more efficient than organizing things from least to

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