what happened to China in the 19th Century that helped create the social and political environment for the Boxer Rebellion

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Task #6 Summary Report:
Explain what happened to China in the 19th Century that helped create the social and political environment for the Boxer Rebellion

The opium wars between the western world and the Chinese empire was the spark to ignite the fury of the Chinese people. After the Asian forces lost the second war, the westerners made the Chinese sign a humiliating treaty, allowing opium to continue to flow into china, as well as surrendering the island of Hong Kong to the British Empire. Also seaports were opened to foreign powers (called treaty ports) in which there were concession areas which were actually ruled by foreigners. This meant that these were areas where the Chinese were foreigners in their own land.
The ruling
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This is why the missionaries believed that they were entitled to force their faith upon the Chinese people using whatever means necessary. This included, abusing the churches’ power and bully and oppress the local people, this caused much resentment within the Chinese people.
For the conversion to the Christian faith to be legitimate, the Chinese people had to give up their original faith and practices that went along with it. This meant a total reconstruction of their original way of life. This did not bode well with many Chinese people, who considered the missionaries and their converts to be secondary devils.
The rise of the boxer rebellion began when in the summer of 1988 a series of cataclysmic natural disasters, including a massive flood followed by an intense drought. The people of china who still retained the original faith believed these events to be a result of the God’s rage towards the people, the source of this anger was believed to be the presence of the Europeans and the infiltration of the churches.
The leaders of the boxer rebellion were not powerful, wealthy or political figures. They were but common townsfolk and peasants who believed in the destruction of the foreign invaders. Their first move was to hang banners declaring “death to the barbarians” in every village square. The mysterious cult/movement was driven by a burning hatred of foreign people and foreign religions.
Among their

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