Muslims In America

Muslims in America, many of whom are natural born citizens, often feel as if they are unwelcomed secondary citizens to this “land of freedom,” that they don’t belong among fellow Americans. The lack of education and knowledge surrounding the Muslim culture Islamic religion allow Americans to make false claims regarding the inevitable "acts of terrorism" committed by these groups. The negative rhetoric (often perpetuated by biases in media) does not take into consideration the values of peace, love tolerance and acceptance. People who practice the Islamic faith consist of twenty-three percent of the world 's population. To ascribe the atrocious deeds of a select group of sick and misguided individuals to an entire population of Muslims is both …show more content…
It produces a situation where “most Americans do not know the know the difference between indians, afghanis, syrians, muslims, sikhs, hindus.” (Hammad Section 1). As a result of the 9/11 attacks, many Americans see Islam and violence as similar entities. Thus, the September 11th attacks became the manifesting catalyst for anti-Muslim rhetoric throughout the West—the scapegoat for universal terrorism. Hammad’s pain of misidentification speaks directly to concepts Omi and Winant surface in sections of their book regarding colorblindness, where they write that it is “contradictory and shallow” (Omi and Winant 110). Though colorblindness is romanticized and idealized, it does not present a reality; rather, it invalidates identities. Hammad reinforces the notion that, post 9/11, “more than ever, there is no difference.” By tabling race, not only do you suppress the idea that misconceptions of race negatively impact people of color, but there also becomes a greater disconnection between the white and …show more content…
Though there was certainly Islamophobia before 9/11, the younger generation of Muslim-Americans will only see the heightened and increased sense of Islamophobia within our contemporary society. Many of the recent terrorist attacks in this century alone have forced Muslim-Americans to reexamine their faith simply out of fear, fear for their lives and the lives of their families. Ayad Akhtar 's play, "Disgraced," takes us through the life of a Pakistani protagonist, Amir, who struggles to grapple with what some Americans would consider "conflicting identities"—American and Muslim. Though Amir has Muslim origins, he has some rather dismissive rhetoric about Islam and denounces his roots to assimilate into American culture—one that he feels would reject him without his Hindu façade. Religion, therefore, becomes racialized in “Disgraced.” In a scene where Amir addresses Jory (Isaac’s black wife), he yells, “you think you’re the nigger here? I’m the nigger!! Me!!” (Akhtar 72). Amir suggests that his Middle Eastern blood has plunged him down the (made up) ladder of racial hierarchy. Part of his rationale stems from the fact that post 9/11 anti-Muslim rhetoric has made middle eastern people the target of hate

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