What Are The Importance Of Early Childhood Education

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Most of us have learned about history and historical events at some point in our lives. From educational lectures and classes, to documentaries about historic events. History lessons can show us about influential aspects in the current world setting. Some of the the stories may be disregarded as such, without taking into account the various influences leading to that event and the other defining patterns with similar outcomes in other instances. There are always factors that cause events to take place. They can be based of many things. Political factors, educational bounds and limitations, environmental benefits or dangers. Take the lessons that each event has taught us, learn from the past. Look at the idea, points and outcome. How does …show more content…
They all found that early childhood education is essential for normal childhood development. These ingenious facts and accounts can be translated to other educational ideas through other corresponding cultures. Some the basic elements of early childhood learning can be seen in other walks of life and in different or varying forms. Education is the foundation to socialization and the progression of all members of society. It is essential to provide proper educational environments for the future of …show more content…
As time progressed. Early childhood teaching theories, and learning methods adapted. New wealth offered better educational facilities, and better skilled teachers and instructors. Tutors or teachers were integrated into the early stages of development and learning, usually from ages 5-6. In some instances, there would be a school or local educational facility. After the age of 7, a boy would be primarily educated by his father, while a daughter would be educated by their mother. The mother would be responsible for religious training, meal preparation along with making and mending of clothing. Girls were brought up and prepared for a role as a housewife. Some believed that they also should receive a basic education such as boys. But others believed that this was to be a sinful practice. The ones who felt education should be mandatory for women, related it to them being able to manage household accounts. Few Peasant children received a proper education. If they did, it would take place in a monastery, or a secular school in a separate town. Many of the students that were brought up in these environments grew up to become monks or priests. Children that grew up in a religious setting usually would become a member of the clergy or another type of supportive career in service to the church. They practiced reading and writing as the basis to

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