What Are The Differences Of The Struggle Between The North And South?

1014 Words 5 Pages
America has endured many hardships and fought many wars in order to reach where we stand today. One of the most difficult and significant time periods was the late 1800 's when there was a divide between the North and South. Each side had different views which caused great tension between citizens, eventually leading to the Civil War in 1861. The South and North were dependent on different things to support a successful economy like slave labor and developed transportation. Another difference was in their political views, the North being Republican while the South was Democratic. As a result, there were social distinctions like the fact that more children attended school in the North than in the South where education was limited to rich plantation …show more content…
Some of them included Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New Hampshire. Unfortunately, there was still tremendous opposition by the Southern States because they did not view it as a Human Rights issue like the North. However, some slaves took the chance to use the Underground Railroad and escape to the free states in the hope of legally remaining there, or eventually Canada. Southern Politicians put pressure on Congress to take the necessary steps to put an end to this. As a part of his Compromise of 1850, Henry Clay enforced a set of bills to prevent certain Southern States from seceding. Some of these laws consisted of the Fugitive Slave Acts, which made it mandatory for citizens throughout America to aid in the capture of escaped slaves. Many did not want to cooperate willingly and were forced with the threat of possible imprisonment or fines. The Free States responded by strengthening their attempts in helping these slaves subsequently causing the Underground Railroad to reach its culmination. Some States even created new ways to nullify and omit these laws. A year after the law was passed, activists stormed a Boston courthouse freeing slave Shadrach Minkins from the …show more content…
Every man in this Court would have deemed it an act worthy a reward, rather than a punishment.” The reaction of the North was that of respect and veneration because they admired his courage even though they acknowledged that he was a lunatic. Ralph Waldo Emerson even stated the Brown would make "the gallows as glorious as the cross."- He was viewed as a Martyr by the North rather than a terrorist, and this infuriated the Southerners. The Southerners began blaming the Republican Party and insisted that President Lincoln had supported the whole attack. As a result, many in the South could not imagine voting for Lincoln in the upcoming Election of 1860. The Southern States wanted to maintain slavery because it was crucial to their success on their plantations and in their agricultural businesses. The social result of this was a much weaker education for the children in the South opposed to those in the North where it was a systematic requirement. The leading reason for poor education was the expectation for children to work on their family farms, developing “real life” skills that would prepare them to enter into a society which the South

Related Documents