What Are The Consequences Of The Iraq Invasion

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Reasons of US invasion in Iraq and its Consequences The United States spends $648 billion of the total federal spending on the military. The U.S. has its military presence all around the world, and it is best known for their startle foreign policy. In addition, The Unites States has been involved in several political overthrows such as the intervention of Iraq. An invasion mandated by President George Bush in 2003 causing the death of 4,486 U.S. soldiers and a potential cost of up to $6 trillion (Encyclopedia Britannica Online.) Consequently, many theories have been developed in order to comprehend the potential causes underlying such arbitration. Professor Goodwin mentioned some of the main reasons why the U.S. might be spending almost …show more content…
invasion in Iraq served as an American interest that acknowledges the “the depth of elite commitment to its goals and the larger strategic purpose that it served.” Meaning that the invasion was mainly due to U.S. interests to put forward the “American goals” rather than for basic economic reasons, such as oil. In his writing, Chibber proves the reasons against the different theories that have been developed over the years. For example, Containment. Containment meaning the policy of preventing the expansion of a hostile country or influence. Bush II developed this idea arguing that the U.S. had to serve as a follower for democracy, leaving aside communism: the …show more content…
needs. During the intervention in Iran, the US “sold Saddam $200 million worth of weaponry” in order to defeat their enemy. Nonetheless, Saddam Hussain threaten U.S. interests, the White House had no doubt to overthrow or invade his territory leaving aside their past relationships. In 1991 the US imposed sanctions to Suddam Hussain, however, by 2001, he had become the “dictator” (Overthrow, 288.) Furthermore, Kinzer mentions the fact that it is the responsibility of any American leader should put US interests over any other need. However, the US government also assumes that any other country should also put US interests first. Likewise, Chibber argues that United States foreign policy makers had two main goals during the invasion. First to develop a larger military basis in order to protect colonial zones, and secondly to expand businesses in an integrated world led by one main power: the United States. Chibber shows this by first mentioning that “the United States launched a massive, unprecedented expansion of military and logistical institutions” (American Militarism and the US Political Establishment, page 33.) Lastly, by describing Dilip Hiro’s conclusion that “gaining privileged access to Iraqi oil for American companies was a primary objective of the Pentagon’s invasion to Iraq” (American Militarism

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