Reasons Of US Invasion In Iraq

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Reasons of US invasion in Iraq and its Consequences The United States spends $648 billion of the total federal spending on the military. The U.S. has its military presence all around the world, and it is best known for their startle foreign policy. In addition, The Unites States has been involved in several political overthrows such as the intervention of Iraq. An invasion mandated by President George Bush in 2003 causing the death of 4,486 U.S. soldiers and a potential cost of up to $6 trillion (Encyclopedia Britannica Online.) Consequently, many theories have been developed in order to comprehend the potential causes underlying such arbitration. Professor Goodwin mentioned some of the main reasons why the U.S. might be spending almost …show more content…
invasion of Iraq by Stephen Kinzer and Vivek Chibber. I will first explain the basic reasons for the invasion by each author. Kinzer arguing that the main reason is to support U.S. corporations overseas, and Vivek Chibber arguing that America has developed a strategic plan to become the leading power in the World and that invasions such as Iraq are key for the development of such regime change. In addition, I will indicate main similarities and differences among both arguments. Lastly, I will give my opinion and analysis on the reasons why I find Vivek Chibbers’ statement more …show more content…
needs. During the intervention in Iran, the US “sold Saddam $200 million worth of weaponry” in order to defeat their enemy. Nonetheless, Saddam Hussain threaten U.S. interests, the White House had no doubt to overthrow or invade his territory leaving aside their past relationships. In 1991 the US imposed sanctions to Suddam Hussain, however, by 2001, he had become the “dictator” (Overthrow, 288.) Furthermore, Kinzer mentions the fact that it is the responsibility of any American leader should put US interests over any other need. However, the US government also assumes that any other country should also put US interests first. Likewise, Chibber argues that United States foreign policy makers had two main goals during the invasion. First to develop a larger military basis in order to protect colonial zones, and secondly to expand businesses in an integrated world led by one main power: the United States. Chibber shows this by first mentioning that “the United States launched a massive, unprecedented expansion of military and logistical institutions” (American Militarism and the US Political Establishment, page 33.) Lastly, by describing Dilip Hiro’s conclusion that “gaining privileged access to Iraqi oil for American companies was a primary objective of the Pentagon’s invasion to Iraq” (American Militarism

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