What Are Superbugs?

1228 Words 5 Pages
When people think of the “end of the world,” they usually imagine a world-ending meteor, rising tides that reach up into the tops of skyscrapers, or any other disaster that the creative minds at Hollywood have already made into a motion picture event. Yet, one apocalyptic event rarely pops into the minds of people when they imagine the end of mankind as we know it: superbugs. They are not giant insects, but rather, something much scarier. They are antibiotic-resistant bacteria that are unable to be killed by one of the most important aspects of modern health. Not only are these invisible microbes just as deadly and disastrous as a hostile alien race or an environmental catastrophe, but they are also a reality, already affecting thousands of …show more content…
Simply put, superbugs are bacteria that have evolved to resist certain antibiotics. Although not resistant to every antibiotic, a superbug can overcome the hurdles of regular medicine and may require the use of more expensive and dangerous antibiotics to be killed. Even more so, any of the hundreds of bacterial diseases that exist can develop a resistance to antibiotics. The cause of this resistance stems from the unnecessary use of antibiotics (i.e. using them to combat viral or fungal infections) and not consuming the necessary dosage that is prescribed. If left untreated and unchecked, these bacteria can evolve a resistance to any antibiotic thrown at them. As the World Health Organization (WHO) expressed, “[antimicrobial resistance] is an increasingly serious threat to global public health that requires action across all government sectors and society (WHO).” Being able to circumvent the foundation on which modern health relies on makes the threat of superbugs one of the most challenging and unforgiving issues of our …show more content…
According to the National Air Traffic Controllers Association (NATCA), “On any given day, more than 87,000 flights are in the skies in the United States.” Other statistics show that almost 3 billion people travel annually. In the viewpoints of the deadly superbugs, those 3 billion people are 3 billion modes of transportation to spread and flourish in other areas of the world. Some travelers may unknowingly spread a serious bacterium, inadvertently causing an exponential growth of disease carriers as more and more people get infected. This will cause millions, if not billions, of people to easily and quickly get infected, and with today’s heavily competitive global market, a pause in trade for more secure health regulations will be seen as an economic threat that most countries will be unwilling to

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