What Are Miles Franklin's Search For Real Love?

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In the first passage, Miles Franklin expresses the intense need human nature has for love. Although it is only the right kind of love that brings satisfaction. Through the experiences of Sybylla’s, Aunt Helen, Franklin is able to show what possibilities are in store when ‘wrongfully designated love’ occurs and the need to search for ‘real love’. Within the character of Sybylla and Aunt Helen, Franklin is able to capture although the search for love is indefinite, you can do everything right and still end up the latter. You can be ‘beautiful and loveable’ yet end up ‘humiliated and outraged’ due to the ‘cruellest way by man’. This brings forth the feminist aspect introduced by Franklin, yet possibly unknowing, in the desertion experienced and …show more content…
Despite ‘Colonel Bell’ becoming ‘tired of his lovely bride’ and ‘openly living with the other women as his mistress’, Aunt Helen being the female was ‘forced… to return to Caddagat’ and put to shame being ‘neither a wife, widow, nor maid’. These thoughts of Sybylla’s introduced by Aunt Helen at the beginning of passage one, ‘There is any amount of love … you must search for it’, influence Sybylla’s actions and opinions towards the notion of love and the only ‘real love’ that is possible is gained through ‘the almost universal love of your fellows’. This concept of the love for Franklin and Sybylla’s, fellow Australian is also highlighted in the third passage through the recognition of ‘brothers’ and ‘sisters’. This brings forth a key aspect of Franklin’s work, being the strong expression of early Australia and Australia …show more content…
The particular notion repeated draws the reader’s attention to the feelings of Sybylla as well as the how the class ranking of the 1890s caused a great deal of the population, emphasis on females, to feel like or even labelled as. Although this powerful emotion of low estate, the true Australian nature of holding your head high is also highlighted by Franklin at the beginning of passage three through the repetition of ‘I am’ showing the gratitude towards the way of life that she had been born into. ‘I am proud’, ‘I am an Australian’, ‘I am thankful I am a peasant’. This also brings forth a sense of satisfaction for the reader in Sybylla’s content and accepting nature through the realisation that ‘I am only’ which is repeated in humility towards the awareness of being ‘a—women!’ and a ‘commoner’. This acceptance Franklin also brings to light through the repetition of ‘I love you’ putting forth appreciation for journey which has occurred and the true Australians nature which shows ‘strong in your

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