What Antiviral Agents Are Prescribed For Influenza Case Study

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1. How will you respond to Mr. Sebelius’ statement?
Antibiotics will not help a viral infection, in fact they may increase antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
2. What antiviral agents are prescribed for influenza A?
Neuroaminidase inhibitors (zanamivir, oseltamivir and permivir) as well as the adamantanes (amantadine and rimantadine) are all affective against influenza A although adamantanes will not be prescribed in the United States unless under very special circumstances (Zachary, 2015). Oseltamivir, Tamiflu is the drug of choice for influenza.
3. What are the dosage ranges, action, use, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, drug-to-drug interactions, drug to herbal or food interactions, contraindications, adverse effects, guidelines for
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For mechanically ventilated patients, this drug can be dissolved in 20 milliliters of sterile water and placed down the NG/OG tube followed by a sterile flush of another 10 milliliters of sterile water ("Tamiflu Lexicomp," 2015). This medication does not need to be taken with food although it can if it causes GI distress.
This drug does not replace the flu shot nor does it stop the spread of influenza to others. Contact your healthcare professional if you experience severe GI issues that don’t stop, problems with your nervous system or a serious skin reaction while on this medication. Take this medication as directed and do not miss a dose, if you do take the dose as soon as you remember unless it is time for the next dose. Do not take two doses at one time. Store the capsules at room temperature and the oral suspension in the refrigerator, do not freeze the medication ("Tamiflu Lexicomp," 2015).
4. What are the recommended guidelines in prescribing antiviral agents for influenza
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What are the dosage ranges, action, use, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, drug-to-drug interactions, drug to herbal or food interactions, contraindications, adverse effects, guidelines for administration, and patient teaching for the administration of antitussive agents? Antitussives are used to reduce non-productive coughs associated with the common cold in order to allow patients to rest or sleep (Woo & Wynne, 2012). Antitussives should not be used for persistent or chronic cough related to pneumonia, asthma, smoking, or patients with copious respiratory secretions because they weaken the body’s ability to clear the airway. (Woo & Wynne, 2012, p.348). Dextromethorphan, codeine, and benzonatate are antitussives that work through a poorly understood process in which cough is either centrally or peripherally suppressed (Woo & Wynn, 2012, p.348). Dextromethorphan is absorbed well in the GI tract and acts centrally to reduce the urge to cough (Woo & Wynne, 2012, p.438). It is metabolized by the liver and excreted through the renal system (Woo & Wynn, 2012). The dosage for adults, such as Mr. Sebelius, is 10 to 30 mg every 4 to 8 hours (Woo & Wynn, 2012, p. 439). Even though current guidelines advise not administering antitussives to children, dextromethorphan is sold over the counter and with guidelines allowing for children 6 to 12 years old to take 5 to 10mg every four hours or 15mg every six to eight hours and children 2 to 6 years old able to have 2.5 to 7.5 mg

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