West Egg And West Money In The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald

1284 Words 6 Pages
In the novel, The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, money is a powerful entity that influences many decisions and what happens on East Egg and West Egg. The two Eggs separate the two types of money. The “old money” types from East Egg have had money passed down through generations but the “new money” or newly rich type who made their earnings working in New York City reside on West Egg. Gatsby, a mysterious yet wealthy up and coming man from West Egg is not concerned how much money he spends. From his extravagant parties to his expensive collection of silk shirts, Gatsby is the perfect example of how money can affect a person 's life. However, one thing that money cannot buy is Daisy Buchanan, “the golden girl” (Fitzgerald 127). For the …show more content…
Since he was a young boy, Gatsby has been a person with very high goals. Growing up in Minnesota to a poor family helped Gatsby learn the meaning of working hard in order to be successful. After Gatsby dies, his father tells Nick, “Jimmy was bound to get ahead. He always had some resolves” (182). Gatsby’s father noticed his son’s determination from a young age and how he always had a chip on his shoulder. Gatsby did not want to be held back by the poor childhood that he experienced and became very dedicated to achieving his most important goals. Moving to West Egg and becoming a well known individual for his large parties and luxurious cars, Gatsby seems to have achieved the “American Dream” of coming up from nothing, but Gatsby feels as though he is missing something in his life and will not stop until he finds that missing piece. Reuniting with Daisy has been Gatsby’s lifelong goal and his determination to get her back is the reason why many are quick to call him “great”. When Jordan Baker, a friend of Daisy is talking to Nick, she states sarcastically, "It was a strange coincidence, But it wasn 't a coincidence at all...Gatsby bought that house so that Daisy would be just across the bay" (63). Living across from the Buchanans made Gatsby’s goal feel close and plausible knowing that Daisy was just across the …show more content…
Before Gatsby left Daisy to go to war, their relationship was very strong. However, as time progressed and the relationship began to fade, Daisy chose to move on with her life and start a new life with Tom Buchanan.They had a child and started doing new things making Gatsby fade further into the past. “In June she married Tom Buchanan of Chicago with more pomp and circumstance than Louisville ever knew before. He gave her a string of pearls valued at three hundred and fifty thousand dollars” (80). The comfortable and wealthy life Tom Buchanan was offering to Daisy was too great to pass up. The uncertainty about Gatsby drew Daisy closer to Tom and his “old money”. The marriage between Daisy and Tom is the unofficial end of the relationship between Gatsby and Daisy but more importantly is the end of Gatsby’s dream that he worked so hard to succeed at. Gatsby feels differently about the situation and believes that Daisy can leave everything she made while they were apart and continue with their relationship which was stagnant for five years. The nostalgic nature of Gatsby is felt when the narrator exclaims, “[Gatsby] wanted nothing less of Daisy than that she should go to Tom and say: "I never loved you." After she had obliterated four years with that sentence they could decide upon the more practical measures to be taken. One of them was that, after she

Related Documents