Money In The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald

1189 Words 5 Pages
In The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald the people are separated by the islands of West Egg and East Egg. People in West Egg are considered to be less fashionable and less sophisticated, and East Egg snobby and rude. What separates them is how they got their wealth, new money and old money. "Money documents social class, is connected to the American dream, and is intertwined with love" (Tate). These show throughout The Great Gatsby with Gatsby lying to Nick about where he got his money from and him trying to fit in with the old money or East Egg people. In the Great Gatsby Fitzgerald shows how money controls many things in New York; social standing, class, chances, and how people act. Social standing is divided into new money …show more content…
In Daisy’s case she needs a man with money to support her rich lifestyle. So she could not marry Gatsby and had to marry Tom since he had his family’s wealth. "Daisy 's pursuit of happiness in the form of her dangerous, defiant love for Gatsby surrenders to the palpability of a safe, material, unequal propertied union with Tom Buchanan" (Callahan). Daisy needed a stable life and marrying a wealthy man was the closest she could get to it, despite not being in love or having honest feelings for Tom. Both Daisy and Gatsby wanted each other but Daisy thought having wealth would make her life better. "Afterwards, on his forlorn lover 's progress through the streets of Louisville, Daisy 's hometown and scene of their love, Gatsby understands: To win Daisy he gathers money and property, the latter transient and garish, in the quick and illegal ways open to him—Meyer Wolfsheim and the rackets" (Callahan). After Gatsby gets back from the war he finds out Daisy has married someone else, and he starts to gather up wealth in order to win her back. As he makes his money through illegal businesses and underhanded deals he starts to get a suspicious …show more content…
Gatsby ran underhanded ‘drug’ businesses to get his wealth then lies or never tells about how he got his money. And Myrtle wants to fit in and show off, but her husband George does not have lots of money so she turns to Tom to be her ‘sugar daddy’. "For example, Myrtle Wilson focuses on material possessions available to her from her lover, Tom Buchanan, but shows little regard for the lives disrupted by her extramarital affair with Tom" (Verderame). Myrtle, like many others, want what they want and do not think of anyone else affected. Her focusing on the material things she wanted left her husband feeling he could not do anything for her. Her wants for wealth blinded her from what she had. "Hence, The Great Gatsby simultaneously depicts both the allure of wealth and moral disapproval of the sometimes empty, corrupt, unsatisfying lives of those who achieve wealth" (McAdams). This is shown in both Gatsby and Myrtle. Myrtle running away from her life to live another with all the she wants and Gatsby making up his

Related Documents