Weather Factors In Decision Making

2053 Words 8 Pages
Conducting a safe flight requires the ability of pilots to make correct decisions in different environmental situations. Researchers prove that errors in decision-making and pilot judgment contribute to 60% all aviation accident (Shappell & Wiegmann, 2000). Although many variables can alter how the quality of the pilot’s decision, as experience, age and time limitation are significant factors in response to problem solving. The following essay investigates how different weather factors may affect the process of decision making for a pilot, focusing on variables such as expertise, age and time constraints. Firstly the discussion starts off with understanding decision-making and its process. Next it will be followed by an analysis of influencing …show more content…
Within cognitive psychology, research on expertise is a rapidly growing sector (Wiggins & O’Hare, 1995). Significant studies have been completed, but lack major influences of the real world such as time, workload, uncertainly of the outcome and the risk involved (Wiggins & O’Hare, 1995). Weather related decision making is dependent and restricted by the environment, along with the fact the complexity of variables are more serious as the risk is higher and there is major degree of uncertainty. Decision making techniques can vary depending on the situation and environment. It can be noted that analytical thinking is effective form of making decisions in a high risk environment, but research identifies that in response to weather related decisions, intuitive strategies are much more useful (Wiggin & O’Hare 1993). Intuitive thinking process is seen within experienced pilots as their episodic memory allows them to react and make effective choices rapidly compared to a novice. Different experiments have been conducted has to further analyses this …show more content…
An experienced pilot has the justification of previous knowledge along with involvement with a similar situation, but a novice does not. This is demonstrated in video scenario three. There are different responses a Visual Flight Rules (VFR) pilot might make when faced with adverse weather. Video three represents deteriorating weather up ahead which includes areas of rain. An experienced pilot from their visual scan pattern will instantly understand that it’s not safe to keep going ahead and will turn back to their departure location or an alternate aerodrome. However from an inexperienced pilots perspective either their unable to recognize the risk ahead due to lack of inaccurate judgement, or even their unwillingness to notice the dangers. Pilots with less experience may feel optimistic of their course of action while they continue on flying into adverse weather due to their poor judgment. Soon their risky actions may lead them in to IMC conditions, by then only minutes are required to create the casual flight into a disaster. Another option maybe that the inexperienced pilot continues on but soon diverts back or is required to make a precautionary landing, which can come with different risks along with the added pressure (Batt & O’Hare, 2005). The pressure of time ticking is an addition to stress an inexperienced pilot may

Related Documents