Water Scarcity in Arizona Essay

1803 Words Nov 10th, 2011 8 Pages
WATER SCARCITY

Word Count 1519

Water scarcity is increasing worldwide and dramatically affecting first world nations such as Spain, Australia, and the United States. All nations are now starting to recognize that the world's water is a finite resource, and that resource is being drastically altered in both availability and quality by development, climate change and population growth. In the United States, the Colorado River is experiencing rapid declines in volume. Recent studies and data suggest that the changes in frequency, intensity, and timing of the availability of water will have substantial impact on the way we live our lives in the 21st century and beyond. As Letmathe Brakeck said, “I am confident that, under present
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Already adapted in other cities in the West, conservation policies have been put in place during periods of prolonged droughts. Cities such as Las Vegas have Stage 1, 2, and 3 levels of conservation measures in place. These measures restrict outdoor car-washing businesses to four days per week. Stage 3 measures restrict water use at hotels, restaurants, laundries, construction companies, and golf resorts. The city limits their own construction companies to using city water only two days per week. In addition, it stops all construction activities that use city water during such times (U.S. Water News Online). Restaurants are banned from serving water to consumers unless they request it. After three warnings, the water service to the offending organization is terminated by the city. It is regulations such as this that are of urgent requirement and application especially in the Phoenix metropolitan area. Instead, we continue to water our lawns in the mid of the day and insure our golf courses are bright and green, ready for play. In addition, rural areas do not have stringent methods for conservation and quite often the residents are less affluent, particularly on Arizona's Indian reservations, unwilling or unable to accept any added economic costs of conservation. According to the Arizona Department of Water resources, rural agriculture accounts for about 70 percent of Arizona's water use. However, immediate conservation efforts, in terms of

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