Wat Tyler's Rebellion Analysis

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King Richard II’s Underserved Loyalty by the Commoners Wat Tyler’s Rebellion was written after 1381 by an anonymous author to persuade the readers that King Richard II did not deserve the loyalty and devotion put forth by the commons. The author provides the reader with a chronicle of the peasant’s revolt in which he presents the commons’ reasons for revolting and how the King reacts to each interaction with the commons. The peasants are portrayed as justified in their actions, while the King is portrayed as a leader with no preference towards helping the peasants. In the beginning of the chronicle, the author reveals the reasons fueling the peasants rebellion. The peasants are being heavily and unjustly taxed. The author states that not …show more content…
He initially sends his messenger to them “asking why they were behaving in this fashion and for what cause they were making insurrection in his land”(479). This information helps solidify the authors persuasion that the King was believed to have been ignorant in regards to the subsidies being forced on the peasants. After agreeing to meet with the commons and “make, according to their will, reasonable amendment of all that was ill-done in the realm”, the King was easily persuaded by some of his nobles that these commons “were men without reason and had not the sense to behave properly”(479). He, therefore, did not abide by his word and meet with the revolters. In response, the commons request the heads of many of the nobles the King has with him. The King also does not grant this request to the …show more content…
Despite the fact that no help has been provided by the King, in the meeting that ends the revolt the peasants greet him in a loyal manner, continuing to show their devotion. “Welcome our Lord King Richard, if it pleases you, and we will not have any other king but you”(481). The war is then ended following the beheading of the peasants leader. The King “granted them mercy”, ordained many knights, and finally supported the mission of the peasant’s revolt. The author presented the reader with the circumstances which forced the peasants to take action. After many requests for aide from the King, the commons were denied. The peasants only received help from the King, to whom they showed great devotion and loyalty, after he was forced to intercede. The author provided ample evidence that the King showed no favoritism or for the commons, despite the fact that they consistently gave him their loyalty and

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