Waste Management Problems

2446 Words 10 Pages
Recently, waste production has emerged as a serious global problem. Statistics say, “Every two hours, we throw enough garbage to fill the world’s largest container ship with trash which is about 12 container ships every single day and 4380 container ships in a year” (“Household Waste Statistics”). With the increasing rate of waste production, waste management is a concern for every country, including the USA. However, the methods many countries have chosen for waste management cause harm to the environment and human health. Burning toxic waste and dumping in landfills eventually lead to various complications including the current issue of global warming and climate change. Although recycling is a comparatively safer alternative, only a few …show more content…
Packaged and processed items are the easiest and quickest ones to grab and munch on while people hurry to the ongoing race for achievements. However, we don’t even have time to think where those packages end up and how they affect our home, that is, the earth. According to a research in 2013, “U.S Plastic Bottled Water Sales has increased from 2.8 billions of units in 1996 to a staggering 42.6 billions of units in 2010” (“2013 Bottled Up Report”). However, this consumption pattern is found in most of the other developed as well as third-world countries. “Only the plastic waste we produce globally has created a gigantic plastic soup in the Pacific of up to 15 million square kilometers – almost the size of Russia. The source suggests this plastic soup could double in size just over the next 10 years” (“Plastic in the ocean …show more content…
The foremost benefit of recycling is undoubtedly environmental conservation: “Recycling one ton of office paper is equivalent of conserving 24 trees. Also, only if the recycling rate can be increased to 30%, it reduces greenhouse gas emissions by as much as removing nearly 25 million cars from the road” (“Recycling Benefits”). While almost every industry is directly or indirectly depended on natural resources, depletion of such natural resources and further complications due to the reason have emerged as serious issue globally. If recycling can be promoted in such sectors to a large scale, the goal set for environmental conservation is easily achievable. Nevertheless, recycling has a big impact on economy as well. Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District writes on its website, “The recycling industry has a total economic impact of 169,000 jobs and $6 billion in annual wages and accounts for $7.3 billion in annual sales, only in Ohio” (“Recycling Benefits”). The recycling industry can introduce a new horizon of job opportunities and contribute to minimize the growing problem of unemployment and poverty. The Bureau of Labor Statistics specifies, “The median annual wage for refuse and recyclable material collectors in the remediation and other waste management services industry group was $29,610 in May 2010”

Related Documents