Analysis Of Washington The Indispensable Man By James Thomas Flexner

Great Essays
Washington, the Indispensable Man by James Thomas Flexner offers a refined condensed nonfiction account of his previous four book biography that explores the life of the Father of America. The tall historical character is painted as a brave leader, slave owner, reluctant politician, and a passionate, but fierce general. From his birth in 1732 to his death in 1799, Washington is portrayed excellently, encompassing his adoption of American independence, his leadership in the Revolutionary War, and the his eventually return to public life as the first President of the United States. Flexner rescues Washington from the legends and myths that regard his life and gives the reader a humanizing look to a man and not just a national icon. George Washington …show more content…
Washington’s strategies and efforts would outlast four different British commanders and eventually win the war. Washington’s empathy evokes passion and admiration from his soldiers because he considers their condition during the dreary parts of the war. Washington also amassed respect and appreciation from the public’s perception because of his endeavors to foster fellowship between the army and citizens (Washington attempted to be temperate and not impress goods or equipment from the general people). Washington’s popularity across combatant channels became directly evident in his unanimous election as the first President of the United States. Because of his yearning to manage his estate, he was constantly split between his obligations to public life and Mount Vernon. Although he was bisected in his domains of incumbency, Washington never neglected his duties to either expanse; however, his presence disconnected from his home has diminishing developments on his property. As President, Washington is fully aware that his example will be a precedent for others and takes care to avoid expressing his view on controversial matters like he had previously done when he was voted …show more content…
From his introduction, James Thomas Flexner reveals his goal to disentangle the “figments of the modern imagination” from the man and depict him accordingly. Flexner furthers elaborates on how by examining the history of our founding fathers, we can “…determine without prejudice… exactly how men behaved.” Through this Flexner finds inspiration and hopes that like him his readers will also find inspiration even when they stand in hopelessness. His primary purpose of conveying a disillusioned portrayal of Washington is notably accomplished and will reach a broader audience than his previous four-book biography of our first President. Flexner fulfills my expectations with the book with his extensive knowledge which is regarded as fact due to his substantial credibility. While a few minor points could be challenged for the most part his literary integrity is sound. Knowledge of the one the men who made our country is certainly what I expected to attain from my comprehension of the book, but what I gathered was much more. I was drawn into judging a man, not an icon, and discovered for myself with the author’s guidance the flaws and the admirable qualities of “a great and good man.” Flexner’s thesis mirrors his goal and likewise is clearly evident in his introduction and is constantly supported through

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