Was Julius Caesar Good Or Bad

Good Essays
Julius Caesar. Arguably the biggest name in Roman History. Regarded by many as the greatest leader in the history of the Roman Empire. Born Gaius Octavius Caesar, and known as Octavian, he grew up from the age of 4 with no father. Raised by his uncle, Julius Caesar, who he later inherited the name from. Caesar grew to be dictator of Rome and left on his conquests to conquer other peoples. Until he was ordered back. Knowing he'd be killed he made possibly the boldest decision of his life and crossed the Rubicon River and invaded Rome. But what if he hadn't crossed the Rubicon? What if he didn't know what awaited him when he returned? Maybe he would have set forth a butterfly effect changing the entirety of our current knowledge of the Roman …show more content…
Was his assassination really worth it in the end? What if he hadn't made that fateful choice of crossing the rubicon with his army? He was bound to be killed anyways if he had come back alone. Caesar was smart so when he was ordered back to Rome he had the idea in his head already that he wouldn't live to fulfill and continue as the dictator of Rome for life. What if he had come back alone? He was a cunning and sharp man, maybe he could use that to his advantage and only be sentenced to prison or something less. It would've stopped the entire plot to assassinate him. He would simply be alive in jail for however long the Senate decided. Not a single conspirator would've even been a conspirator or died because they wouldn't have even had the idea in the first place. Also the soldiers and people who died or killed themselves in the battle would still be alive and Rome would've still been a strong empire. Caesars death sent Rome into turmoil. If he was alive Rome wouldn't have rioting or have fallen apart. Caesar was the cement Rome used to build its empire. He held it together and maybe if the conspirators had realized that sooner, they'd all still be …show more content…
Caesar coming peacefully to Rome and yes maybe he would've been executed, but many other lives that didn't need to be taken for something so petty. Caesar being executed and dying honorable would've at least kept the citizens under control. Also the conspirators wouldn't be looked at so harshly and rioted against. Yes people would be upset and mourn Caesar however that way it would've been settled on more peaceful terms. That same act of Caesar crossing the rubicon started a gigantic chain of horrible deaths and uncontrollable riots. Also this led to the fall of Rome itself. So if Caesar really wanted what was best for Rome, maybe coming back alone and taking an honorable death wouldn't have been such a horrible idea.
In conclusion, no matter what path Caesar had taken, it led to death. The Roman Senate had checkmated him. However he was so blind to see what his actions would cause that it led to the complete downfall of Rome. Both paths leading to one outcome. Death. But would Caesar really have chosen the same path if he'd seen the horrors of his choices later on? Who knows. Maybe the next big decision someone makes will cause the downfall of our “empire” today. So choose

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    He could of totally avoided it if he had killed Antony after killing Caesar. The conclusion of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar. Brutus was the tragic hero of this play. He had tragic flaws and mistakes. He should of listened when he didn’t.…

    • 965 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Right before he commits suicide he says, “Caesar, now be still; I kill 'd not thee with half so good a will,” (V.v.50-51). Brutus means that he is killing himself with only half as good intentions, as what he killed Caesar with. He is indirectly telling Caesar that he might have still been a conspirator and killed him, but his intentions were honest, just, and pure. Even though Brutus’ actions should have led Rome to keeping a democracy, the conspirators intentions mixed with his caused Rome to instead be led into having an emperor (dictator) and led to the deaths of most of the conspirators and to the death of Shakespeare 's tragic hero, Marcus…

    • 1508 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    There are also some reasons that Brutus should join the conspiracy. First is that they may kill Caesar with or without him and if the public riots against conspirators the rome could end up destroying itself. Another reason is that if his loyalty point him to the republic then he should stick with it but if his loyalty to caesar overpowers his loyalty to the republic then he will choose caesar. Finally if Brutus really wants to save the republic he needs to join the conspiracy and kill him because Caesar will destroy it. Brutus should not join the conspiracy.…

    • 540 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Later in the play when Cassius suggests killing Antony as well, Brutus denies his request. Noble Brutus replies upon Cassius’ request, “Our course will seem too bloody, Caius Cassius” (II.i.162). Antony’s murder would cause the Romans to further lose trust in Brutus. Caesar and all relations to him being destroyed would cause Rome to think less of Brutus. This loyalty to Rome is Brutus’ tragic flaw that leads to the downfall of Brutus, the tragic…

    • 1396 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Marcus Brutus’ ancestry is shown when the play states “There was a Brutus once that would have brooked Th’ eternal devil keep his state in Rome as easily as a king” (I.ii.159-161). Next Brutus suffers from a catastrophe which takes part in making him a tragic hero. The catastrophe Brutus suffers from is when he realizes that the other conspirators did not kill Caesar for the right reasons and that such an honorable person put himself with such bad people. Brutus was great friends with Caesar and he loved him but Brutus felt that he was compelled to kill him because that was what was going to be the best for Rome and its government. For example Brutus states “Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more” (III.ii.21-22).…

    • 1684 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    “...Age, thou art shamed! Rome, thou hast lost the breed of noble bloods! ...O, you and I have heard our fathers say, There was a Brutus once that would have brooked Th’ eternal devil to keep his state in Rome As easily as a king” (I,ii,150-161). Continuing through that a tragic hero must have a tragic flaw. Marcus Brutus has the tragic flaw of having poor judgment, because he so easily trusts people, such as the conspirators consequently causing Marcus to be ignorant and blind to the fact that they were planning to kill Caesar, not to better the government but for personal gain.…

    • 1701 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    It shows how good of friends they were and how he was a little disappointed to kill him. But even though he kills Caesar for the right reasons, his friends do not. In the play, Brutus is the descendant of Junius Brutus. Junius Brutus kicked all the kings out of Rome and established a democracy. As Brutus reads a letter that Junius Brutus wrote, he thinks out loud, “My ancestors drove Tarquin from the streets…

    • 1216 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    There were better ways to handle the situation. There was also no reason for Caesar to be killed since he never actually did anything wrong. Finally, killing him just caused more trouble than before and it led to Brutus, Cassius and many others to be killed. Everyone would have been better off if the conspirators had of thought of these things before murdering Julius…

    • 704 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    It would take the combined effort of three men and the senate themselves to topple the Roman Republic. The First Triumvirate and the eventual assassination of Caesar by the senate would set in motion the collapse of the Roman Republic. It would seem that it was destined for the Roman Republic to fall, because despite the senate’s efforts to keep their power and influence it was them who pushed it over the edge. The problems of the Republic should have been solvable by compromise, but the aristocratic solidarity upon which the entire Roman system rested began to break down. The death throes of the republic began in 133 BC.…

    • 1164 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Not everything he did for a reason had a good outcome. Some of the things he did had a negative outcome like letting antony live caused a war between Marcus Brutus and Caius Cassius against Octavius and Marc Antony. Another bad choice was leaving portia behind, that led to her killing herself. Or letting Antony speak at the funeral, which Antony told the people of Rome about the conspirators and what they did. But Marcus Brutus killed Julius Caesar because he wanted a democracy in Rome.…

    • 1505 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays