Walter's Receptive Language, The Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test?

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To assess Walter’s receptive language, The Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT) (Dunn & Dunn, 2007) and the Test of Language Development – Primary 3rd Edition (TOLD-P:3) (Newcomer & Hammil, 1988) were administered. Walter earned a score on the PPVT yielding a in a percentile rank of <1, which corresponds to a profound disorder in receptive language. Scores for the TOLD-P:3 could not be determined due to incomplete testing despite maximal verbal, visual, and/or tactile cueing provided. Walter demonstrated the ability to identify familiar objects. Utilizing his strengths, a therapy plan was developed to improve his overall receptive language abilities, specifically targeting identifying vocabulary, answering WH-questions, and sequencing events …show more content…
The book was selected for several reasons: the illustrations support and enhance the story, the story of a child losing something is relatable, the text is repetitive, and the vocabulary is grade-level appropriate. Before the reading, the clinician will introduce the book and encourage discussion by asking questions as the clinician and Walter look through the illustrations (e.g., Why is there a mitten in the forest? What characters do you think we’ll see in the story? What do you think this story is about?). As the clinician reads, Walter will be instructed to follow along using his finger to encourage engagement and print awareness. Emphasis will placed on the pictures while the clinician reads as the illustration supports the text inferencing the animals and actions described in the book (e.g., ) .During the reading, the clinician will ask Walter to predict what will happen next in the story in addition to WH-questions related to the story. Due to Walter’s limited language abilities, each WH-question will have three picture answer choices (see appendix A for an example of the questions that will be asked). The clinician will instruct Walter to verbalize and point to the correct response. If Walter is incorrect, the clinician will provide motivating phrases and various cues (e.g., “That was a good try, but this animal is very small” and returning to the respective page ). If Walter is …show more content…
The second activity is intended to target receptive/expressive language, formulating grammatical sentences, and increase use of light tech AAC. The clinician will say, “Where is the _____?” going through the list of animals who appeared in the book. If Walter is unable to point to the correct animal, the clinician will change the question and say, “Show me the ____.” The clinician will provide additional cues if Walter is unable to point to the correct picture (e.g., “This animal flies”). If Walter is incorrect after receiving additional information, the clinician will use a hand-over-hand technique to guide Walter’s hand to the correct response. After Walter identifies all the animals, the clinician will instruct Walter to cut out and paste each animal in the order that they appear in the story. If Walter is unable to determine the correct sequence, the clinician will provide verbal and visual prompts, in addition to returning to the book for the correct response. In order for Walter to obtain the scissors, glue, and mitten, the clinician will instruct Walter to request the supplies utilizing the PCS (e.g. “I want the scissors.”). If Walter is unable to request the needed supplies, the clinician will provide Walter with symbol options to provide further prompting. If options does not elicit the correct

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