Organ Donation: The Complications Of Organ Donation

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Organ donation is the process through which human organs are obtained for transplant surgery (Funk & Wagnalls New World Encyclopedia). The primary reason a person becomes an organ donor is to give a gift of life to someone. According to United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) 121,524 people are awaiting for the lifesaving organ transplant. Of those, 77,096 people are active on waiting list. There is presently an organ shortage crisis in the United States. On average, 22 patients die each day while waiting for a transplant that cannot take place because there is a shortage of donated organs (Rhode Island Medical Journal). Major policy and regulatory changes need to be made in order to narrow the gap between the demand and supply of organs (Rhode …show more content…
Living donor goes through the same level of complications as a major surgery such as pain, infection, blood loss, blood clots, allergic reaction to anesthesia, pneumonia, and injury to surrounding tissue or other organs and even death. It is not simple as giving blood for donation. Some other possible risk factors include hypertension, the large amount of protein in the urine, organ impairments or failure that leads to the need for dialysis or transplantation (American Transplant Foundation). These kinds of complications can also scare a person to not give an organ. I for sure would be afraid to die of complications and suffer in the end after giving an organ to someone else. It is the major decision and should be thought …show more content…
The percentage who registered permission for donation on their driver 's license application rose from around fifty- one percent in 2005 to sixty percent in 2012. Of those who had not done so, sixty percent were considering it. Only 1 in 3 of the "no 's", were unsure about donating,” (Medical News Today). Most of the time family members are not aware of the diseased person’s decision or wish to donate an organ and they might oppose to taking the organ out. That can hold up the process for the person waiting for the organ. According to the article Death’s Waiting List by Sally Satel, only 30 percent to 40 percent of Americans say they have designated themselves as donors on their driver’s licenses or one state- run donor registries. There is a lack of knowledge and education in the United States for organ donation. A system needs to be created where the person can gain more education on organ donation and able to ask the questions and get answers in return. If more education were given on the topic, we would have more donors in the United States. There are people who are uneducated and also not aware that they are able to survive and lead a healthy life with only one kidney. This would help tremendously and would create less traffic in the waiting list for an

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