Booker T. Washington: A Comparative Analysis

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Equality and the means of obtaining fair treatment of all people has always existed as a controversial topic of debate. Even just the mention of civil rights generates heated discussions and usually leads to aggression. All the hostility and violence ensued from outraged activists destroys thousands families and towns. W.E.B. Du Bois, an equal rights revolutionary during the early 1900s, advocates for these vicious and fierce fighting tactics, in which the end results justify the mode. On the opposition, Booker T. Washington exemplifies the contrasting method of harmony and hard work to acquire a fair stance in society. Both ideals set the precedent for those pursuing equality and how they would achieve it. However, to gain civil rights, …show more content…
For example, Ghandi’s peaceful ideals focused on respect and understanding his enemies rather than attacking them because he believed those amicable views made it possible to negotiate civilly (“Pacifism”). Nevertheless, initially, Ghandi’s peaceful protests often ended violently, however over time they began to entice more nonviolent followers because many referred to violence as a feeble tactic (Young 1700). Gandhi soon won the approval and support of many by obtaining rights for South African and Indian citizens through nonviolent methods (“Pacifism”). Gandhi referred to his resistant techniques in India against British imperialists as honest but unyielding and powerful, which inspired other leaders, like Martin Luther King Jr. (Young …show more content…
He disagreed with bickering political parties, like Marxists and Socialists, and longed to construct a harmonious relationship to further advance and amend broken ties between disagreeing groups (“John Haynes Holmes”). With the topic of feminism, Lucy Stone urged and justified women’s as well as black’s rights through her talent of preaching and helped establish the American Woman Suffrage Organization. She handled her own life as an example for women’s rights by marrying Henry B. Blackwell and neglecting the customary marriage vows of a woman’s obedience to her husband. She also retained her maiden name and therefore her individuality, which was unheard of in the 1850s (“Stone, Lucy”). Thus, various models of nonviolent resistance emerged throughout history and introduced the fundamentals for those in the

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