Piaget's Theory

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Piaget is considered one of the pioneers of cognitive development in children. His studies focused on the importance of the education of children theoretically and not specifically the methodology.
The central idea of Piaget’s theory is that children develop their own theories of the world around them and these theories are based on interactions with not only the environment but also the people within it.
He describes how children use “schemas” or actions to gain information about their environment and this is how children fundamentally grow and develop. As a child’s understanding of situations grows so to does their understanding of their individual world. This is set within Piaget’s framework of four sequential stages each needing to be achieved
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However one noticeable differing opinion is that Vygotsky believes in the importance of relationships and interactions between children and what he refers to as MKO’s or More Knowledgeable People. It is his opinion that these MKO’s provide a means of “scaffolding” (Berk, 1996) that enhances and deepens the learning experience of a child. Essentially the scaffolding provides support for more difficult problems whilst the child is developing but then is removed as the knowledge “strengthens” to allow the child to reach its full potential.
As a result the fundamentals of this process are communication, which Vygotsky sees the role of language as critical to the development of the child’s thinking process. divided into 3 levels of moral reasoning and argued that this was a natural progressive sequence not only for children but also adults (Kohlberg, 1963). He broke down these stages of moral reasoning into age brackets.
Level 1 or the Pre-Conventional Level, children behave because there are consequences for certain undesirable behaviours not because it is considered desirable to do
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Specifically conduction a lesson on baking will allow several components of the Concrete operations level to be developed with the child being able to conduct the majority of the learning independently. Being that baking involves measurements it will allow children to understand the concept of conservation. Providing measuring cups of all shapes and sizes as well as other types of utensils accompanied by the multiple types of ingredients both wet and dry, will provide the perfect platform for discovery

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