Women Against The Vote Analysis

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On the other hand, Julia Bush makes a different argument. In her book Women Against the Vote, she reveals not all women supported the idea of women getting the right to vote in the Great Britain. Some women were against voting rights because they believed motherhood and family were the most important in keeping society together. Anti-suffragist believed their interest as mothers needed protection and gaining the right to participate in the parliamentary process would distract them from motherhood. Organized anti-suffragism movement often chose to cast itself in the role of democratic forces, and wanted to keep the gender order intact to keep the structure of society together.
The women’s suffrage movement started out of the changing relationship
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“Behind nineteenth century feminism was the frustration felt by gifted women at the relative uselessness of their lives. A bitter condemnation of Victorian Young Lady hood is to be found Florence Nightingale’s Cassandra.” The development of women activism started partly under the influences of the advocate of women rights and the need for stability in life. Women were starting to see that their life could be more than motherhood; they wanted to now make a different in society and the British government. However, the only way to bring these changes was to gain the right to vote in parliament. In the proposals of John Stuart Mill, in his Reform Bill of 1867 he …show more content…
The Central Committee was formed in London in 1872 to co-ordinate and sought to flight for women rights. In the 1888, the Central Committee split into two, their many disagreements during this time over allowing political groups to affiliate. After many years, the group reorganizes and the National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies was formed. This organization was a key driving force to the vote being won for women and help women come together as organization. Other driving forces of the Women’s Suffrage Movement were Lydia Becker and Millicent Fawcett. Born in 1827, Becker took an active role in the intellectual and public life of Manchester. She later becomes the editor of the Women’s Suffrage Journal and the backbone of the movement in it early days. Becker with the help of Women’s Suffrage Journal was a valuable resource of keeping the various suffrage societies in the federation in touch with one another and informing events in connection with the cause. Other women’s suffrage leader was Millicent Garrett Fawcett. In 1867, she married Henry Fawcett, a member of the Brighton parliament and becoming a political activist. Fawcett later became part of a racial and intellectual circle of women in London, which wanted women emancipation. She eventually became president of the National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies (N.U.W.S.S), from the 1897 until 1919. These two women were

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