Voltaire, Hobbes And Locke Was The Declaration Of Enlightenment

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The Enlightenment, taking place in France and dominating European philosophy during the eighteenth-century, gave birth to many new ideas regarding legitimacy of authority and governmental power. Many philosophers of the time such as Rousseau, Montesquieu, Voltaire, Hobbes, and Locke had many different ideal forms of government and major beliefs, shaping today’s world. Rousseau wrote that the process made by civilization and enlightenment had corrupted the human nature. Montesquieu had a different view, as he favored the English system of separation of powers. Voltaire was a strong supporter of monarchal power, writing History of the Russian Empire under Peter the Great. Hobbes believed that internal strife within the government would be inevitable …show more content…
He was famous for his attacks on the Catholic Church, and his advocacy of freedom of religion, expression, and separation of a religious government. Voltaire was a skillful writer and used his literary skills to write works describing his personal beliefs regarding many areas of philosophy, history, and political sciences. He challenged the Catholic Church in his work, Philosophical Dictionary, where he questions the truthfulness of priests and the morality of the Bible. He also wrote of the government in his work, History of the Russian Empire Under Peter the Great, where he supports the power of monarchs and explains his belief of it being the ideal form of government. Voltaire also wrote of religious tolerance in his work, Treatise On Tolerance, in reaction to the execution of John Calas who allegedly murdered his son to prevent his converting to Roman Catholicism. Voltaire, a knowledgable figure during the French Enlightenment, wrote many works regarding his beliefs and further progressed many unaddressed issues at the …show more content…
Rousseau and his general pessimism regarding the governmental and societal structures greatly differed from many other intellects of the time. Suggesting that humans are chained down by society, his ideas are still held in great esteem. Montesquieu and his belief that one government system is not ideal for all areas greatly influenced later leaders. In The Spirit of Laws, he writes how many variables should be taken into consideration in order to determine the most effective and controlled system of government. In general, he favored the idea of a checks-and-balances system which served as the foundation of the United States government. Voltaire and his disagreement of a combined religious and governmental power attacked the Catholic Church. Through his many writings, he wrote of his stance regarding many issues at hand and assisted in spreading ideas more freely during the Enlightenment. Thomas Hobbes and his work, Leviathan, greatly supported monarchs of the time, suggesting that it was the ideal government system. In this work, he supports enlightened absolutism, strengthening the central absolutest administration at the cost of lesser centers of political power. Lastly, John Locke and his theories regarding human psychology and his supporting giving power to the masses as being the ideal form of government enhanced

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