Volleyball Biomechanical Analysis

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A volleyball serve is one of the most important movements when playing the game of volleyball. Without the proper techniques, the serve can ultimately make a difference in a win and a loss. The detailed science of a volleyball serve can best be described using kinesiology, or the study of anatomical principles and physiological mechanics of movement, and biomechanics, the study of forces and there effects on living things. Once the kinesiological aspect is understood for this particular movement, the biomechanical analysis will then be applied to the volleyball serve in order to instruct a volleyball player on the correct qualitative and quantitative aspects of a serve. Particular movements for a volleyball serve, encompass both structural …show more content…
In order to obtain this position, it requires isometric effort from the lower body to begin the entire serve. Depending on normality for the athlete, the tossing arm is the left arm for a right-handed player and the opposite for left-handed athletes. In the case of a right-handed player, the right leg is out in front. While a serve is performed mostly in the shoulders, most of the player’s power comes from the hips and …show more content…
Starting with the trunk, the muscles (erector spinae, iliocostalis, longissimus, spinalis) concentrically contract while the right external obliques and left internal obliques concentrically rotate the trunk to the right. The left hip flexors (rectus femoris, pectineus, iliacus, adductor longus, adductor brevis, adductor magnus, tensor fasciae latae, sartorius, gracilis, psoas major) isometrically contract to flex the right hip while the right hip muscles (biceps femoris, semitendinosis, semimembranosis, gluteus maximus, adductor magnus) isometrically contract to maintain extension. The left and right knee extensors (vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, vastus intermedius, rectus femoris) isometrically contract. The left ankle muscles (gastrocnemius, soleus, plataris, tibialis posterior, flexor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus, peroneus longus, peroneus brevis) isometrically plantarflex, and the right ankle dorsiflexors (tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, extensor hallucis longus, peroneus tertius) concentrically contract. The left toes extensors (extensor hallucis longus and extensor digitorum longus) isometrically contract, and the right toe flexors (flexor hallucis longus and flexor digitorum longus) concentrically contract. Going superiorly, the cervical extensors (rectus capitis posterior major, rectus capitis posterior minor,

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