Volksgemeinschaft In The Aryan Society

800 Words 4 Pages
The Volksgemeinschaft was the Nazi ideal of a perfect Aryan society. It was created to bridge and replace traditional class and social divisions. Hitler wanted all ethnic Germans who were considered pure to come together into one community to be a superior dominating race. People, who were not ethnically German, possessed communist, homosexual or Jewish values would be omitted from this community. For Volksgemeinschaft to have existed violence had to exist too. Violence has always been used in opposition to the law. The ideology of Volksgemeinschaft helped the Nazi government take away the basic rights of the Jews. Overall the “ideal” had considerable appeal in the early 1930s. The Nazis almost always used force to instill their ideologies …show more content…
It is defined by culture, language and race. Wildt argues this concept came into its own during the First World War. Jill Stephenson makes the point that the Nazis creation of a “National Community” was only partially completed. For Wildt Germans were lured by the promise of unity and strength. Wildt argues that the German people took part in anti-Semitic acts to promote and protect Volksgemeinschaft. “Volksgemeinschaft, was a matter of ‘self-empowerment’ ” (50) To back up his claims Wildt makes examples of racist Volksgemeinschaft through the “smaller communities” in Germany during the period. “Anti-Semitic violence was the product of two conditions: the presence of Jews and either an NSDAP organization or a party formation such as the SA” (68). There was a enormous divide between town and country, due to rapid …show more content…
This is mostly due to the Nazi regime’s attempts to undermine the church. People who were involved in the anti-Semitic were mostly youngsters and adolescents. “The regime’s hostility to the Catholic Church, because of the encouragement given by priests to Germans to show solidarity with Polish co-religionists, in particular” In the farming communities of Württemberg the Nazis policies weren’t really understood well. Even though many people lived in the Nazi regime it didn’t mean that they whole-heartedly supported it. “Farmers obstinately refused to relinquish their trading relationships with Jewish cattle dealers.”(53) The Nazis propaganda tools like the radio were not really listened to by farmers either. For the Germans in smaller communities to be part of the regimes plans it normally took a low level NSDAP leader to convey the message perhaps using violence as persuasion method. In the Württemberg villages this was rarely the

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