Visual Art In The 1920's

Improved Essays
Although the Roaring 20’s and the Great Depression are consecutive time periods in the United States, both periods impacted the american visual arts in different ways. During the 1920’s the United States economy was thriving while socially, younger generations were jumping onto the new era of the pop culture and extending their creativity by breaking traditional styles and themes. Influenced by the developing world, the visual arts also did the same, “[a]rt...in the 1920s was all about testing the status quo and producing something innovative and dynamic. Themes of sexuality, technology and social progress were prominent in the art and culture of the decade”(" American Art, Pop Culture & Literature of the 1920s") . New artistic movements such …show more content…
Regionalism was an art movement that focused on scenes of rural life, “[the] style was at its height from 1930 to 1935”("American Scene Painting - American Regionalism and Social Realism"). The movement was appreciated by Americans because it gave a sense of comfort by reminding people of the american lifestyle they were accustomed to during the difficult time. The movement included several different styles. One of the styles was called “American Scenes”; the style portrayed the daily life of americans and the rural american lifestyle through photography and fine art. Another was called “the people” this style is similar to that of the “American Scenes” because it also illustrated the daily american life but instead it firmly focused on the american people rather than landscapes. The style gave people dignity as it reflected the hard work and strength in America during the economic crisis. Although the style captured positive imagery during the Great Depression it also captured the cruel reality of the Great Depression. Some artist and photographers decided to use this reality as a way to expose capitalism and its abuse against laborers; this style became known as “social realist”. Activist artists used their work to fight for rights and to create political movements. Although some artist took advantage of the New Deal programs others were …show more content…
As the economy thrived and social evolution took place during the Roaring Twenties artist reflected this into their artwork creating art movements such as Art Deco and the Harlem Renaissance. Shifting into the Great Depression many artist were employed by New Deal programs. Artist took different approaches in their artwork to create personal perspectives of the Great Depression and its effects. While some portrayed daily american life to comfort americans during a time of distress, other artist used their work for activism. Then, there were artist who wanted create art without the need of analytical

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