Acinetobacter Baumannii Research Paper

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Acinetobacter baumannii is a gram negative coccobacilli bacteria. It is an aerobic Glucose non-fermentative and oxidase negative. This bacterium is able to avoid desiccation for more than 30 days. It can be Opportunistic pathogen in human and It is commonly isolated from the hospital environment and hospitalized patients causing nosocomial infection [1]. This bacterium is responsible for causing several diseases in human such as pneumonia, urinary tract infection, Meningitis, wound infection, and blood infection [2]. Many classes of antibiotics such as Aminoglycosides, Carbapenems, Macrolides, and Penicillins are used to treat these infections. However, A. baumannii known as Multidrug resistant Actinobacter baumannii (MRAB) which gives …show more content…
This bacteria is commonly present in dry surfaces as well as hospitals environment therefore it is known to Couse nonsocial infections for the hospitalized patients [6]. In addition, the virulence factors that produce by this bacteria are the main reasons to Couse drug resistant in this bacteria. Producing biofilm for example is one of the virulence factors which enhanced antibiotic resistance by specific mechanism [6]. This structure is attached to the bacterial surface making the communication between A. baumannii and it is also recognize to Couse human infections …show more content…
baumannii infecctions, it has been recently emerged healthcare-associated infections and nosocomial outbreaks. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) A. baumannii is a rapidly emerging pathogen in healthcare settings, where it causes infections that include bacteremia, pneumonia, meningitis, and urinary tract and wound infections. This bacteria use several mechanisms to keep its self survive in the present of the antibiotics, For example, multiple mutations can couse high level of resistances [10]. Another reason is A. baumannii can be resistant to some of the antibiotics such as tigecycline [11]. Also, efflus pump system play major role in the multidrug resistance of A. baumannii

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