Aristotle Virtue Is The Highest Good For Man Essay

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Malik Reyna-Mclemore
Paper Two; Aristotle’s Virtue as the highest good for man
Phil 2310: Meaning of Life
Professor LaMendola
Fall 2017
Virtue as the Highest Good for Man
Explain Aristotle’s argument for the exercise of virtue as the highest good for man. Finally, and from your argument, explain whether Aristotle presents us with a compelling framework for happiness and meaning. Give examples.
Aristotle’s purpose of the Nicomachean Ethics is to recognize the highest good for man and how we ought to live in aim of this good. In Fact, I sure that more than 90% of the world believe that the highest good for man is the allegations of wealth, honor, or sexual satisfaction. Aristotle claims that all of these goods are insufficient to the pursuit
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We must realize that the laws that are set are for the good of man in order to understand that doing what is right in time becomes a habit and in harmony with these kinds of good behaviors. Correspondingly, the legislator who creates these laws must possess the intellectual virtue of Phronesis; the Greek word for a type of wisdom or intelligence, A virtue of practical reasoning. This can be connected to the understanding of virtuous and vicious behavior in knowing how to direct people to do what is …show more content…
Ross, and Lesley Brown. “The Nicomachean Ethics”. Book 2. Chapter
1. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. Print.
Kraut, Richard, "Aristotle's Ethics", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
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Moschella, Melissa. "Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics Summary". GradeSaver,
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Hursthouse, Rosalind and Pettigrove, Glen, "Virtue Ethics", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2016 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = (-- removed HTML --) .
Aristotle, W D. Ross, and Lesley Brown. “The Nicomachean Ethics”. Book 2. Chapter
5. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. Print.
Schroeder, Tim, "Desire", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
(Summer 2017 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = (-- removed HTML --) . Homiak, Marcia, "Moral Character", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
(Fall 2016 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = (-- removed HTML --)

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