Crisis And Trauma Theory

2097 Words 9 Pages
Due to its unknown nature and being unpredictable, every human is vulnerable to experiencing a crisis (Jais, 2016). This essay demonstrates what psychological impact occurs from crisis and trauma that is caused by a violent crime. Violent crime is defined as an aggravated assault that includes some sort of life-threatening nature or bodily harm is caused to one or more individuals (Fazel & Grann, 2006). Violent crime situations that involve crisis and trauma are explored from a counselling perspective. This is achieved by suggesting what particular models and assessment tools could be appropriate. A resource list [A1] is also included and it entitles what services and support could benefit a victim after their incident. For clarification, …show more content…
The National Organization for Victim Assistance team (NOVA) developed a model of the process that victims who experience a violent crime will generally process and it has three major components (Jimerson et al., 2005). The first is the emergency response of when the crisis occurs, the second is in regards to the victims stabilising themselves for the days following and the last component involves victims attempting to gain mobilisation and recover from the crime altogether (Young, 2002; Jimerson et al., …show more content…
This means that it can be easily changed or quickly altered so side-effects are desirably maintained or desist (Kanel, 2012). When doing an intervention, the counsellor’s main focus and goal is to increase the client 's functional state of being (Roberts, 2012). When individuals encounter a violent crime they may be pushed to a breaking point and process such events as being too traumatic, distressing or unsettling (Kanel, 2012; Brown, 2012). It is vital to assist mindfully and aid with caution, as victims may falsely perceive you to be threatening or dangerous due to the situation of violence (Myer & Conte, 2006). The Triage Assessment System (TAS) is an assessment that could benefit victims who have just experienced a violent crisis. The TAS is ideal for assessing each involved individual and it begins by ranking on who is most in need (Myer & Conte, 2006). Attending to the person with the most severe symptoms and distress is the goal and this would further identify those who are able to wait for their intervention (Halpern & Tramontin, 2007). Due to the welfare of a violent crime, the criminals would be an example of when an intervention may not occur straight

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