Comparing Viola And Orsino In Shakespeare's Twelfth Night '

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Viola/Cesario & Duke Orsino:
Mutually, key figures of the main plot of the play. Viola the survivor of a shipwreck, disguises herself as a man named Cesario to work for Duke Orsino. As Cesario she is sent to the grieve-stricken Lady Olivia, and onto the duke’s behalf to woo Olivia, who ignores Orsino’s attention. Under an entangled masquerade Viola as a male becomes privy to Orsino’s inner desires, and as his confidant she falls for him, and Olivia falls for Viola—the male ruse messenger. A hot-mess! And a fabulous Shakespeare dramatic irony.
Curiously, Orsino grows fond of Viola as Cesario, and he states to Cesario in scene IV, “Thou know'st no less but all; I have unclasp'd, To thee the book even of my secret soul” (Shakespeare). Then,
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Does that new hair-do, haircut, makeup or accessories change how you feel, act or walk—ever? If you find or lose yourself in a more foo-foo setting while casually underdressed for the occasion, does it change your demeanor and even your posture? What-a are you rindin’ nowadays? Does your dismounting style change, and depend on your feel from the transporting vehicle? Some people have mastered not caring, the “I don’t give a rat’s arse” attitude (trust me, that comes with time, it’s fabulous, too), or perhaps another mask to hide;) Undoubtedly, it is human nature more than at times superficial for some, and all these factors do affect a person’s behavior, personalities and attitudes about themselves and others.
Consequential, outright or in subtle ways, but we do this often with fashion and clothing (ect.) which has a complex relationship with identity. Sure, clothing cannot be read or does it speak directly, nor should it define our perception of self and others, but it has or will, again (depends on the nature or maturity). Interestingly, in Elizabethan days and other ancient times this was requirement to dress in one’s social stature. Today, it’s a more openminded and interpretive personal choice, and somewhat affected by
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As a leather wearing and laidback persona on my motorcycle, I become another, or for a better term, it’s an existential of a more fearless and social side. I may write a lot candidly, but I’m quiet and reclusive in my vicinity. I also wear masks as an artist, in fact, I have pseudonyms for each depending on the genre I’m writing. I even made one into my legal business name. As a child I did use artistic vibes, instruments or writing to mask and escape. I embrace and love those masks and continue to nurture with aim. Masks have therapeutic merits that grant abilities to unleash surprisingly the unknown, and substantive insight. People, also love the entertainments of them, hence theater, movies… and for more intimate fun surely the reason behind roleplay.
Other observations or examples: People tend to express themselves unapologetic or sincere through masking. I’m not Catholic nor religious for that matter, but I’ll use this example of confession, as it’s done usually behind a screen, a form of veil of secrecy in confessional box or booth, and this bestows a mask for redemption and purging. Fast forward a bit, a less dogmatic approach and we have the digital masks; internet’s social platforms, where one is protected by a screen and armed with a keyboard. Alas, some use this form wrongfully, too. Catfish!

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