Vincent Van Gogh's Genius Is Dissension?

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Genius is Dissension On a gloomy day in 399 BC, a prolific philosopher lost his life through execution for daring to question moral character and believe differently from the state. In 1663, a dignified astronomer paced his home in solitude after being placed under house arrest for proposing the preposterous hypothesis that the Earth revolves around the sun. In the spring of 2013, thousands of people roamed through an art exhibit displayed at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. The exhibit showcased the work of an artist who was once detained and threatened after creating a “controversial” piece of art made of 38 tons of steel scavenged from the aftermath of the 2008 Sichuan earthquake, which resulted in the death of more than 5,000 children. …show more content…
Yet, in their own times, society labeled them as “mad men” and “heretics.” The Spanish Inquisition punished those who dared voice an alternative opinion than the one promulgated by the Catholic Church. Many eminent people forfeited their lives and liberties in the pursuit of truth and greatness. Although many of them fell short of achieving this in their time, today humans recall their legacies and livelihoods with fondness and esteem. Vincent Van Gogh sold very few paintings in his lifetime and failed to reap the admiration his work enjoys today. He chopped off his own ear and reportedly committed suicide via a bullet to the chest, which increased public opinion of his insanity. However, modern critics postulate that Van Gogh mutilated himself and later, killed himself not solely because he was mentally ill; he maimed himself because society restrained and ignored his genius and imminent greatness because he went against the grain in both art and thinking. This led him into a spiral of a bleak and suffocating depression, which he could not and would not accept and handle. This may be slightly romanticizing his death, but the principle that a man absorbs the opinion of his critics and fellows remains. Van Gogh consumed the rejection and internalized it as dejection and anguish. However, many philosophers exalt …show more content…
Other opinions admonish Weiwei’s art, claiming he exploits real social issues in order to bolster his own radical opinions or shock people and make a quick buck. Other people, especially the Chinese government, view him as a menace whose treasonous art endorses gross inaccuracies. It is impossible to accurately predict how Ai Weiwei will be remembered by history, but it seems unlikely that a man who perseveres with exposing what he regards as unjust and inhumane through beautiful and deep works of art will retain a negative legacy. One of Weiwei’s most recent exhibitions incorporates a recording of the names of 5,000 children who died in the Sichuan earthquake. The reading of the names plays on a constant loop and it requires three hours and forty-one minutes to read all of them. Through this piece, Weiwei places the blame for the deaths of shodding construction jobs of schools by government workers. Other of Weiwei’s pieces include photos of him dropping a Han dynasty urn, small houses made of imported tea leaves picked by impoverished Chinese workers and shipped to America, and the creation of the stadium for the 2012 Summer Olympics in Beijing, which he later rejected for being a “pretend to smile.” Although his impact is not entirely known, Ai Weiwei, unlike Van Gogh, refuses to be silenced. Being cognizant of the impact of his art, he proceeds to create even after being arrested and beaten nearly to death. He pushes for his greatness even

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