Vimy Ridge History Essay

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Canada’s images throughout the years has changed and evolved into what it is today. A peacekeeping nation. But it wasn 't always known as that. Canada was a nation just like any other building and improving itself, but it wasn’t until the First World War that people started to notice Canada as its own country. Events from the First and Second World War and the Cold War have shaped Canada into what it is today. Events such as Vimy Ridge, where Canada had to fight against the German Sixth Army in a battle that no other country could win. This is the fight that would decide if Canada is truly its own nation that is able to hold its own. In the Second World War, Canada’s task was to raid a German occupied port called Dieppe. The events that followed …show more content…
Vimy Ridge is an escarpment and it was where the battle occurred. Canadian Corps had to take control of the high ground to get an advantage but it was already held down by the German Sixth Army. This proved to be a difficult task and Canadian Corps underwent weeks of training to prepare for this battle. Victory was highly dependent on the heavy artillery fire so they could use it as cover. In the end, Canada came out on top but many people died and to this day, many of the soldiers still don’t have any graves. This victory made Canada known and recognized globally as an independent country. It was the first time all four divisions of Canadian Expeditionary Force participated in battle together. Canadian Corps had soldiers from all regions of Canada. Canadian Corps were successful because of tactical and technical advantages in battle. In this battle, Canada’s national identity and nationhood were born. Canada’s exceptional victory in the battle of Vimy Ridge helped form Canada as its own country. No longer overshadowed by Britain, Canada became known as a nationalistic symbol of achievement and …show more content…
Canada formed the Canadian Peace Congress which was an anti-imperialism group in 1949. It allowed people with different views to come together to improve international affairs, reduce the use of violence, and work towards a common goal; peace. The Canadian Peace Congress (CPC) councils campaigns in many places where there was a lot of violence. They also believed that there was no need to make Canada a military powerhouse. “Canada has no need for an imperialist posture in international affairs”. The CPC wanted Canada to be a peacekeeping country with a good reputation. The CPC also believed that there is no use of violence. There first campaign was to collect signatures worldwide on a petition that demanded the atomic weapons to be destroyed. They also wanted to close all foreign military bases. They truly believed all conflict should not be handled with violence. They simply wanted to work towards a common goal which is peace. “They promoted the concept of peaceful co-existence between the Communist bloc and the Western bloc”. They were affiliated with peace councils all over Canada and they also worked closely with the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF). In conclusion, the Canadian Peace Congress was anti-imperialism group that wanted to improve international

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