What Is The Code Of Ethic Of Journalism In The Vietnam War

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It is very accurate and honest and precise to the writer knowledge like the Code of Ethic require of the journalist to do, but this article has a negative tone toward the Vietnam War by writing that the bombing of the Vietnam was a failure. As this article was written by someone in the Associated Press, it upholds the Code of Ethic of Journalism. The article was candid about the war and bombing. At this point of the Vietnam War America, a citizen was starting to want nothing to do with the Vietnam and just wanted the fighting and bloodshed to stop. The article brought up the point about the war like how the U.S. government says that they were not targeting civilian, but civilian location like a hospital was hit by accident. This act would just …show more content…
These two articles write about the subject of the fighting that is going on in the North Vietnam is being so different from just being years apart. 2 Victories Claimed in Central Viet Nam Sweep by Allies were all for the war and giving the vibe that American were a winner with its talk about killing the Viet Cong and show the Viet Cong in a negative light by speak of the fifteen-year-old boy that was part of the North Vietnam fight force. It is a different story of the article Bombing of North Vietnam Seen Failure when it comes to the tone of the war. Instead of giving the vibe the United States were winning this article talk about the complete failure of the going on in the Vietnam War against the North Vietnam. There are only seven years, give or take a few months, between these articles being published and it is just how the media reports. It causes a shift in between people who want to leave the war and let Vietnam figure out its problem. The tone shift in the media changes right after this event and the Anti-War movement got a leg to stand on. While there is a change in the tone of the media about the war the journalists that wrote these articles still follow the Code of Ethic that is set for them by writing as accurate as they possibly can for the time. They did their jobs and reported on what was …show more content…
These newspapers and broadcast give insight into the Vietnam War, which one of the unpopular and conversational wars of the United States history. It was a war that almost last twenty years and one that end the United States of American to fail to do what they had set out to do. To this day, the Vietnam War is still talking about in a negative light by American people. Many Americans from this era of the still hold this was in contempt today. One thing that contributes to the dislike would have to be the because it was uncensored war. On the televisions, it showed the American civilians the horror of the battlefield such as death and gore. The media would report thing different from what United States government was saying. A good example is the Tet Offensive, which is as stated before a very famous military surprise attack event of the Vietnam War by National Liberation Front and North Vietnamese army attack cities and military base in South Vietnam. This event of Vietnam War got Americans to think critically about what was going on in the war and start to think getting involved with Vietnam as a bad idea as the media reports on what happens and saying the showing and writing about what was going on in Vietnam. For the fact that the government called the Tet offensive a victory when a reporter by the name Walter Cronkite of the war

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