Victor Frankenstein In My Sister's Keeper

Victor’s creature is not a monster. He is a being that has been misguided and rejected by society. The creature is not a real monster; it is a victim. The creature did not begin its life as a monster but became one after Victor Frankenstein rejected it and refused to realize that he must take care of this creature from now and forever and be responsible. The creature was born defenseless in this world. Victor ran away because his creature was horrifying, but the Creature did not have any cruel intentions. The Creature did not do anything bad. The creature did not come into this world on its own accord. The first feeling the creature was met with was rejection. His complete disregard for humankind, obsession with playing God, and his selfishness …show more content…
Since a young age, Victor's interests fall into the category of chemistry; mainly that of the balance between life and death. While at the University of Ingolstadt in Germany, Victor becomes obsessed with the idea of reanimating life out of inanimate objects. Victor seemed to think that by creating this “new human” he would be doing humanity a service. However, this is not the case. In Jodi Picoult’s My Sister’s Keeper, a young girl, Anna, is suing her parents for the rights to her body. Her sister, Kate, has leukemia and she has been genetically made to keep her sister alive by undergoing surgery after surgery. A quote that perfectly captures the mood throughout both My Sister’s Keeper and Frankenstein is: “Life isn't nearly as stable as we want it to be” (Picoult 380). In the end of My Sister’s Keeper, Anna is the one who ends up dying and no one truly has a happily ever after. The same can be said in Frankenstein. Actions have consequences and they affect everyone, not just the …show more content…
His most selfish act has to do with the murder of his brother William. Victor is fully aware that it is his creation that has murdered William, yet he does not confess. He withholds knowledge that could have spared Justine’s, the servant, life: “Justine also was a girl of merit and possessed qualities which promised to render her life happy; now all was to be obliterated in an ignominious grave, and I was the cause!” (Shelley 66). Victor admits to himself that he is culpable for Justine’s death. However, he thinks he was responsible because he created the creature, not that he withheld crucial information. Even after he learns that it was his creature who has committed all the awful acts in town, Victor cowardly allows Justine to take the blame for William’s murder. Victor is also to blame for Elizabeth’s, his wife’s, death. Victor describes the scene when he founds her body as:
“She was there, lifeless and inanimate, thrown across the bed, her head hanging down, and her pale and distorted features half covered by her hair. Everywhere I turn I see the same figure – her bloodless arms and relaxed form flung by the murderer on its bridal bier. Could I behold this and live?” (Shelley

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