Values Of Organizational Culture

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Organizational Culture Schein (1990) posited that presently, there is little agreement on the what organizational culture as a concept entails (Schein, 1990). What scholars can agree on is organizational culture represents a set of values that define philosophy, approach and style of an organization (Babak, Vahidreza, & Ali, 2013; Smart & Hamm, 1993). Organizational culture is developed from the values and beliefs of the its organizational members (Schein, 1990). Values are organizational norms, beliefs, philosophies, charters and attitudes (Schein, 2010). What’s more, the basic underlying assumptions of an organization can be derived from the historical context, thought processes, feelings, and perceptions associated with the organization …show more content…
Specifically, we will leverage the competing values framework, developed by Quinn and Rohrbaugh (1983) to determine the type of organizational culture at the HBCUs in question. In a two-part study, Quinn and Rohrbaugh asked experts to evaluate 30 effectiveness criteria that were important for organizational effectiveness/ They then analyzed those responses using a multidimensional scaling approach. Results indicated that there were three dimensions that were significant: focus, structure, and means– end (Quinn and Rohrbaugh, 1983). From this initial research, the competing values framework (CVF) was developed. Figure 1 illustrates how the dimensions of focus and structure overlay to define the four cultural types comprising the CVF: clan, adhocracy, market, and hierarchy. Below is a brief description of …show more content…
and is reinforced by a flexible organizational structure. In other words, “organizations succeed because they hire, develop, and retain their human resource base” (Cameron & Quinn, 1999). A primary belief within organization with clan cultures is trust in and commitment to employees is necessary to drive communication and involvement (Quinn and Rohrbaugh, 1983). The adhocracy culture type is externally focused approach indicative of a flexible organizational structure. A fundamental assumption in adhocracy cultures is that a create orientation fosters innovations (see Figure 2). Adhocracy cultures within organizations value autonomy, stimulation, and growth (Quinn & Kimberly, 1984). The market culture type is externally focused and is supported by strong mechanisms to control the actions of the organization’s employees (Quinn and Rohrbaugh, 1983). According to the CVF, an assumption underlying market cultures is an intense focus on competitiveness and aggressiveness to stimulate productivity and in the short term (Cameron & Quinn, 1999). The hierarchy culture type is internally focused and is driven by strong control mechanisms to moderate employee autonomy. As seen in Figure 2, a fundamental assumption in hierarchical cultures is that efficiency is fostered through an intentional focus on control and stability. Hierarchical cultures value formalization,

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