Fanaticism In Tartuffe Essay

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During the Age of Enlightenment, thinkers believed in reason, liberty, and scientific methods instead of tradition and religion. Many writers published their works that stated the problems of the misuse of religion and the importance of critical thinking. Moliere was one of writers during the Age of Enlightenment, known mostly for his comedy. He was a French play writer who wrote the comedy Tartuffe, which shows the concept of religious hypocrisy, ignorance and fanaticism. In the drama, he created various characters who represent different values of Enlightenment. In the drama Tartuffe, Moliere describes the reactions and attitudes of different characters toward the religious hypocrisy to show ignorance and fanaticism. The characters who …show more content…
They use different nature’s things to tell people what’s happening in their lives. Romantic poems give people impression that their lives may leave in people’s imagination and express an graceful way to relate with reality.

A. The quote is from G.W. Leibnitz’s Theodicy. It means there is evil exist, but it is not great amount. It reflects to Leibnitz’s claim that God creates the best of all possible world and tells people what is Leibnitz’s attitude toward God.
B.
It comes from Moliere’s Tartuffe. Even though Tartuffe claims to be pious, we know he is not. It is a turning point of the drama because his hypocrisy will be exposed because his lust for Elmire.
C.
It is from William Wordsworth’s poem “Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey.” This quote describes the way he feels in the past five years. He has deep memory of “beauteous forms” – not like a blind man who cannot imagine the view fully. It is important because it shows the connection between nature and man’s mind.
E.
This quotation is from John Keats’s “Ode of a Nightingale.” He desires for a drink of wine and that he can get thoroughly intoxicated. It is just like he is obsessed with Nightingale’s voice. He wants peaceful way that he can escape the

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