Values In Gabriel Marquez's Chronicle Of A Death Foretold

1500 Words 6 Pages
Inherent within the novel, Chronicle of a Death Foretold, the author, Gabriel Marquez describes many traditions and values within a small town symbolizing the culture and its effect within the civilians. However; as time had progressed, the values embedded within this town would crumble leaving only oppression and abuse to take place. The repetition of the importance of materialism, values and beliefs, marriages, authority figures, and the women’s role critically asses the abusive nature of the Latin American society. “Chronicle of a Death Foretold,” installs recurring motifs to portray the abusive nature of Latin American culture and portray the need to reform its values, in order to halt the unjustified faults that became evident …show more content…
He uses his dispensable income to manipulate the raffle for his own personal gain and secure the attention of the beautiful Angela. Assuming Angela would fall in love with him because of his wealth, he’s shocked when she is not particularly fond of his, “stuck up,” persona. Because of his willingness to contribute his riches, he was of a high importance to the people on the small island, making him a financial pillar to the community. After Angela Vicario had finally accepted Bayardo’s lustful advances, he wishes to please her again with providing her the house of her choice; she picks a home which in unobtainable. The old widower that residing there refuses to sell because it represents his 30 years of happiness he had shared with his wife. When Bayardo offers him an offer he simply can not refuse, he is forced out of his home with all the memories he’d shared with his loving wife. Bayardo uses his wealth to take advantage of those around him, while also undermining the basis of love. The old widower was, “healthier than the rest of us, but when you listened with the stethoscope you could hear the tears bubbling inside his …show more content…
Apparent in the society was the lack of love that made up a marriage and the theme, “love can be learned,” had a large impact on the young newlyweds, Angela Vicario and Bayardo San Roman. The tradition of Spanish culture was that marriage was not based on love, but a way for women to gain status in society. Marriage concealed unrealistic expectations for young lovers, Bayardo and Angela, when Bayardo, “formalized his contract of love with Angela Vicario,” only off her beautiful appearance. Although Angela did not wish to marry, Bayardo had, “managed to impress her for reasons opposite those of love.”Women’s lives were bound to Colombian tradition with an obligation to get married and have children, just as Angela’s mother had prepared her all her life. Angela knew that she would have a greater chance to have a more successful life if she were to marry rich and bring honor to her family, but this is all put into question after Bayardo discovers the shocking revelation Angela is not a virgin; Bayardo, “softly pushed his wife into the house without speaking a word,” returning her to her parents home with much dishonor and disgrace, She then begins a ritual of obsessive letter writing to her estranged lover. Angela, “wrote a weekly letter for over half a lifetime,” symbolizing a motif in the novel. Although Bayardo had never opened one of her letters, he returns to her, depicting the

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