Vinegar Lab Report

1279 Words 6 Pages
Determining Value for Money of Different Brands of Vinegar

Aim – To compare the amount of acetic acid found in two different brands of vinegar to see which is the most cost effective.

Materials –
• Apron
• Safety Glasses
• Hair Tie (If appropriate)
• 50mL burette
• 250mL conical flask
• 2 x Beaker
• Measuring Cylinder
• Labels
• Pencil
• Standard solution of Sodium Hydroxide, NaOH(aq)
• Two different brands of vinegar
• Phenolphthalein Indicator
• A clean white tile
• Distilled water
• Retort Stand
• Funnel
• Electronic Balance

Method –
Pre-Practical
1. Put on and tie up safety apron.
2. Put on safety glasses.
3. Tie up hair if it is long.
4. Ensure a clear and clean work space.

Practical
1. Wash out measuring cylinder with distilled
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If, to compare, Vinegar B was made 2L such is Vinegar A it would come to $11.96 compared to the low price of $4.15 for Vinegar A. Because of this if a lot of vinegar is needed it would be more cost effective to go with Vinegar A although it has less acetic acid because it is less costly for the larger quantity but if only 500mL or less is needed of vinegar, Vinegar B has the better value for money because it has a much larger percentage of acetic acid.

Possible strengths of this experiment includes the use of the same electronic balance throughout the experiment and the experiment used the same Sodium Hydroxide solution. Ensuring the use of the same electronic balance guaranteed if the electronic balance was incorrectly calibrated it would be systematic throughout the whole experiment and assures more accurate results. The experiment used the same Sodium Hydroxide solution throughout the experiment to ensure the concentration didn’t change and skew the
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As the titration of the two different vinegars were completed by different people, the techniques we used may be different therefore the results may be different than if it was completed by the same person. The experimenter may have misread equipment such as the meniscus of the burette. They may not have been at eye level with the meniscus, creating parallax error that may have skewed the results.

Systematic errors that may have occurred are the electronic balance may have been incorrectly calibrated and the increments of the measuring cylinder may have been incorrect. The electronic balance may have been incorrectly calibrated making the weight of substances incorrect but the use of the same electronic balance throughout the experiment ensured that this is a systematic error. The increments on the measuring cylinder may have been incorrect therefore when measuring out liquids, there may have been more or less than what is

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