Us Constitution Personification Essay

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The U.S. Constitution is a vital document to the people of present day America. It is the center point of many argumentative scholars and the secondary topic for awkward situations. It begins with the famous Preamble and the phrase “We the People...”. Although the Constitution had been conceived by the founding fathers of the new nation, its primary goal was to convey, to its citizens, an image of a strong Republic. To replace and surpass the infamous Articles of Confederation and “[ ] form a more perfect union...”. This meant the country was on the brink of reaching a stable yet manageable government. The Preamble also described its means of; establishing justice, securing peace among state lines, contributing to the military, promotion of the well-being of Americans, and finally, ensuring and securing the liberties that the people have striven to uphold.
Unfortunately, our government, at times, does not seem to abide by what it stood for. In present day America, the people actively find the need to protest and doubt many decisions taken by government officials. Citizens of the United States do not feel safe nor do they believe that law enforcement is here to
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As I have covered, the Constitution 's introductory lines stated that a new nation would be founded and it will be the start of a great nation. What it has slowly become, is a nation that is divided among its citizens. Divided by race, gender, wealth, and disabilities. Benefiting the few, disregarding the many. Yet we are the ones to blame. We the people have ignored these issues for far too long. Now that they are growing ever so larger, we begin to place the blame on our government. Not to take away from the injustice that our government has done, but to stop letting ignorance guide us through the issues at hand. America must make changes but in order to make a difference, we must make a difference in our own

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