Urbanism In Diagram Architecture

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Toyo Ito in “Diagram Architecture” describes the architecture of Kazuyo Seijima and the spirit of her structures as ‘diagram architecture’ for the close similarity between the buildings themselves and the scale drawings representing them. Thus, Sejima’s works of architecture merge with the diagrams, as the diagrams showing functional conditions are transformed into constructed spatial forms in the greatest brevity. For Sejima, the architectural convention of planning rests mainly on the spatial diagram, which results in novel physical relationship between space and body as the buildings are expressed in exact with original design drawings or models. Ito suggests Sejima’s novelty as she manages to depict diagrammed modern urban lifestyles with …show more content…
He places ‘field conditions’ in opposition to Modernist ‘object’ approach to architecture, explaining it as a system responsive to the complexity and indeterminacy of the urban context. Allen suggests to have less formal control and design decisions for a more fluid composition of relating parts. And he explains key concepts of these design approaches and how they manage to resolve architectural formal and tectonic decisions, also the programmatic and functional concerns of architecture and urban design. Allen argues that a top down formal solution to any design concern will leave nothing but a closed ended result and that a bottom up approach will prove to be more effective and open ended as a result. I think his approach of field logics in architecture is interesting and teaches us how to design at different scales and landscape …show more content…
Deleuze compares societies of control to disciplinary societies through juxtaposing a factory and the corporation. In a disciplinary society, the factory functions in the capitalistic sense with its objective of maximum production and lowest wages, while the corporation in a society of control promotes reward according to merit. He argues that societies of discipline have been donated to developing countries while societies of control who are richer administrate them. Deleuze points that societies of control are part of the technological evolution who is no longer involved in production, where societies of discipline are the one making production. Deleuze concludes that individuals should be aware of how the shift from discipline societies to societies of control is a method of controlling individuals and of manipulation of power. I think the Deleuze’s argument of capitalism and the industrial revolution promotes the creation of spaces with the purpose of creating goods with a workforce is an interesting approach to architecture to think about how industrial and commercial buildings are brought to construction, and how it leads to the construction of our present

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