Urban Planning In America Essay

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Urban Planning in America

Anderson Drive. Digital Image. DBlayney. DBlayney. Web. 5 Dec 2016. There has been many significant events throughout the history of urban planning, these events have shaped the way that urban planning happens now. Urban planning, also known as city planning, is the process of planning for designs and regulations of land usage, with the focus on physical aspects, economical factors including advantages and potential disadvantages, and the impact on urban environments. Urban planning is a step by step process, which typically starts with a vision leading to the actual development. The growth of cities depends on this process because it factors in sustainable development, urban aspects, and impacts that it will have
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During the nineteenth century, many American cities began to expand mostly from immigration and industrialization. With this population expansion, many slums were created. Slums were overcrowded urban areas, typically occupied with poor immigrants and workers. These slums were poorly taken care of, providing inadequate living conditions. “ The early city planning movement sought to transform the physical landscape, converting ugly, crowded, and dangerous industrial cities into more livable and beautiful communities” (Keating 65). This movement was the start of urban parks such as Cleveland, Ohio metropolitan parks system. Eventually, the movement became known as the City Beautiful …show more content…
The first type of planning is called rational planning, which consisted of realizing and analyzing a problem to having a solution. This type of planning was thought to be unrealistic, creating an utopia. The second type of planning is called comprehensive planning, which are supposed to be for zoning regulations. Comprehensive planning is often criticized as being to vague and often a failure to possible future planning. Another type of planning is called district or neighborhood planning, which are typically made for short term purposes. Neighborhood planning resulted in many redevelopments of slums, and improvements to urban neighborhoods. Site or project planning is considered another form of planning, which is the development of a specific site with the use of old buildings or new, while following the zoning laws. Advocacy planning is also another form of planning, which ensures that the underprivileged voices are heard and equally represented. Lastly, equity planning is planning used to incorporate the concerns of those in need the most while having the least amount of political

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