Urban Area Gentrification Essay

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districts of many cities displaced thousands of households and commercial businesses in adjoining neighborhoods while enhancing the value of the downtown office towers that were made more accessible from the suburbs. The existence of inner-city interstates made it more convenient for downtown workers to live in the suburbs and commute to work, often making it possible for middle-class families to leave the city (Jackson, 1985).
Although once considered to be a disseminate and even a poverty magnet, transit is increasingly viewed as a desirable amenity for an urban neighborhood. Households may prefer transit-rich neighborhoods because of the added ease of commuting or traveling to other parts of the city or metropolitan area. The area adjacent
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Gentrification through transit development can have devastating effect on existing communities, leading to the displacement of longstanding residents. When transit, railway, or highway development takes place, land lords and renters from that area are aggressively – and perhaps illegally – forced out. As the result of development, the property price go up nearby the development area. Therefore, the higher rents make it difficult for low-income households to move into the neighborhood. The existing renters and replaced by those who can afford the higher housing cost, which is refereed as …show more content…
Once transit station is planned or jointed to the existing lower-income (diverse) neighborhood, in months, land values start to increase. Once the land values pick up the pace of rising cost, the rents and home values starts to climb exponentially. The lower-class people have no choice, but to move out of their homes, where they have spent their entire life. The neighborhood is now replaced by the well-educated (upper-middle class or rich) people. They will not be using transit because they are more likely to use their own cars. As a result, transit commuting fails to rise as expected and creates lose -lose situations for the citizens and the United States

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