Unwrapping Criminology By John Kymmel

896 Words 4 Pages
In the book Unwrapping Criminology, by John Krimmel, the history and development of crime, criminal justice, and criminology in the United States is explored. The book goes through the different eras of crime, and discusses all sorts of ideologies shared by criminologists throughout history. The book is filled with background information which gives the reader context for the plethora of crimes committed in the past, and for all the different opinions that theorists have had about criminology. The book takes us through the birth of criminology, its relevance from century to century, and its persisting appearances even today. The book ends up being an organized, detailed, and easily understood timeline of the history of crime and criminology. …show more content…
It also existed in the New World prior to European immigration. All societies, whether they were monarchical, democratic, or republican, had some form of rules and punishments in order to run their establishments. Specifically in the United States, our criminal activity and criminal justice system dates back to years ago. During colonial times, colonists would have many disputes with the Native Americans, and at times natives were treated unjustly. During the same time period, certain religious practices, such as Quakerism, were considered a crime too. Then during the American Revolution, there was a surge of criminal activity as patriots caused all sorts of chaos in the colonies. After the revolution, around the same time as the Constitution and the Bill of Rights were written, the first federal crime bill was created. Shortly after the Supreme Court was established as well. Injustice and criminal activity was incredibly prominent during Andrew Jackson’s …show more content…
In the book, several extraordinary theorists and influential figures are mentioned, and are commended for their contributions to criminology community. These theories emerged during different time periods, and the book does a good job of showing the progression of criminology. The author mentions theorist such as Cesar Beccaria who wanted to reform criminal law under tyrannical monarchs, Cesare Lombroso who believed criminals are born and cannot be reformed, and Charles Darwin who suggested that criminal tendencies are inherited. These particular theorists were around during colonial times. After the Chicago School of Criminology was built, theorist like Edwin Sutherland and Robert Merton emerged, who believed external factors such as society and poverty influenced individuals to commit crimes. As criminology evolved, people began to see that criminals are influenced by economic issues, and social interactions. The book mentions over seventy theorists, and the reader really gets and idea of how criminology was

Related Documents