Wealth In The United States: A Marxist Analysis

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In the United States today, people are debating around the ideals of the candidates for the presidential election. People try to claim how one candidate is unrealistic while the others are revolutionary. Focusing on Bernie Sanders’ campaign, we see the argument rise with his assumptions of money and the United States economy. Supporters bolster how his plans for healthcare and correcting student loans are the stepping stones to a better future. Opposers refute how they have no idea where Sanders expect these funds to arise from, and attack notions of changing taxation to apply better to how wealth is distributed. This resistance to taxation falls along similar beliefs of the United States economy, since people believe the common images and statements placed on it. They claim how poverty is not an absolute issue, since the wealth is distributed to those who truly work for their income. However, these statements are often made and supported by the people who actually hold the majority of America’s wealth, the top 1% or the bourgeoisie. Marxist theory exposes how the economy and its image is controlled by the bourgeoisie in the United States today. First, Mordecai’s video on America’s wealth should be highlighted by Marxist terms. His portrayal of the American population …show more content…
The bourgeoisie are the ones who hold the majority of America’s wealth, despite what ideal notions people have. The bourgeoisie are also the ones who control the means of production and how the economy is perceived by the masses. The reality of poverty is pushed away to conceal how distorted the United States wealth is distributed. Marx’s focus on the exploitation of capitalism helps recover the issues of poverty and show how it needs to be addressed. Poverty can be shown as the problem it is, if the ideologies pressed on the proletariats are challenged and

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