Unrealism In Gatsby

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Believing the world will be fair to you because you are fair to the world is like expecting the lion not to eat you because you didn’t eat him; it is naïve and unrealistic. In the novel, The Great Gatsby, written by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jay Gatsby was hopelessly in love with Daisy Buchanan after years of being separated from her. He expected her to still feel the same overwhelming love for him that he had for her, but that wasn’t exactly the case. Daisy lusted for Gatsby, but her intentions were poles apart from Gatsby’s. Blinded by his undying love, he failed to see Daisy’s true colors. Gatsby is essentially an innocent victim who is destroyed by his inability to accept reality. Gatsby was unable to accept the fact that Daisy had moved on …show more content…
She tended to come off as very materialistic and Gatsby was constantly attempting to impress her with his riches, but he never really saw the problem with this. She only seemed to stick around for his glamorous lifestyle, as if she was only attracted to his wealth and not actually Gatsby himself. “However, as easily as Daisy has brought Gatsby’s possessions into focus, she can just as easily dispel them with a disapproving eye” (Beauvoir Women in Love). Gatsby couldn’t comprehend that Daisy was actually a very selfish person. He once told Nick Carraway, “I want to wait here till Daisy goes to bed. Good night, old sport” (Fitzgerald 145). That night Gatsby was sitting outside to try to protect Daisy just in case anything happened between her and Tom while Daisy selfishly led him on and was inside trying to mend things between her and her husband. She only stuck around for her own benefit. He was too naïve to see through Daisy and see her for what she truly was, which inevitably led to his demise. Unsurprisingly enough, as soon as Gatsby couldn’t provide for her anymore, Daisy was nowhere to be found. Nick Carraway expressed, “I tried to think about Gatsby for a moment, but he was already too far away. I could only remember, without resentment, that Daisy hadn’t even sent a message or flower” (Fitzgerald 174). Daisy was a major factor in Gatsby’s death and she didn’t even have the decency to at least go to his …show more content…
She was far from what he chalked her up to be. He assumed that when he returned from serving in the military he and Daisy would pick up right where they left off, even though it had been five years. A lot can happen within the time span of five years, but Gatsby expected that Daisy would wait around for him like he did for her. Jordan Baker once revealed, “I think he half expected her to wander into one of his parties one night, but she never did” (Fitzgerald 79). Gatsby had expected that once Daisy heard word that he was back, she would come back to him. However, Daisy’s intentions were evidently contrasting Gatsby’s expectations. Daisy was not what Gatsby believed her to be. What he had pictured her to be was merely a figment of his imagination. Hodin communicated, “His life revolves around something that he ultimately does not have” (Hodin Digication). Daisy was out of reach for Gatsby; she was at the tips of his fingers, but he just couldn’t grasp her. They may have been in love at one point, but people fall out of love sometimes. Daisy seemingly did so more swiftly than Gatsby, but he needed to realize that. He was so caught up in his thoughts of love and longing that he seemed to have lost touch with reality. While doing a character analysis for The Great Gatsby, Miller once vocalized, “But from these it is clear that the vague, inchoate dream alights on Daisy, and romantically transfigures

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