Unorthodox In Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

763 Words 4 Pages
Unorthodox is defined as not conforming to rules, traditions, or religion. In Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, the three characters Bernard Marx, Helmholtz Watson, and John the Savage all display unorthodox behavior. Huxley’s Brave New World is centered around the World State and their sexually driven community. Every citizen is scientifically designed for a specific caste and job. The three main characters, Bernard Marx, John the Savage, and Helmholtz Watson are unorthodox, and all in different ways. To begin with, Bernard Marx is both physically and emotionally unorthodox. The first example presented to the reader about Bernard’s unorthodoxy is his physical appearance. In his incubation process, too much alcohol was added. He is part of …show more content…
Helmholtz writes Hypnopedia for the newly decanted infants. Bernard is intellectually unorthodox because he feels that his work is empty and meaningless, and wants to use his writing abilities for something with meaning. Helmholtz says in Brave New World, “But they go such a little way. They aren't important enough, somehow. I feel I could do something much more important. Yes, and more intense, more violent. But what?” (Huxley 70). John the Savage shows Helmholtz Shakespearian literature and is uplifted by Shakespeare’s words. The words from Shakespeare’s writing are exactly what Watson has been missing in his meaningless life. Consequently, while writing Hypnopedia, he begins rhyming about how lonely he is, which is unorthodox because it is questioning the ways of the World State. Watson is exceptionally comfortable in his caste and is the ideal person for his caste. He is able to perceive and feel how shallow a culture he lives in, “I wanted to do a bit of propaganda; I was trying to engineer them into feeling as I'd felt when I wrote the rhymes. Ford!” (Huxley 180). Watson knew what he was writing was unorthodox, but he felt the need to spread his ideas, risk or no …show more content…
For starters, John was born viviparous, which means that he was birthed from a mother and not created in a test tube. Being born viviparously is considered unorthodox. Not only is he unorthodox in the World State, but he is also unorthodox on the Savage Reservation. John is physically unorthodox on the Savage Reservation, because he is the child of The Director, causing him to have a white complexion. John and his mother, Linda, are shunned because of John’s ethnicity and his mother’s unusual sexual antics with the tribal men. Bernard Marx takes the Savage back to the World State in search of a larger purpose. Marx believes that bringing the Savage back will obtain him the attention he has been lacking since day one. Helmholtz Watson introduces Shakespeare to John, and he begins to recite Shakespeare quotes, “The murkiest den, the most opportune place" (the voice of conscience thundered poetically), "the strongest suggestion our worser genius can, shall never melt mine honour into lust. Never, never!" he resolved” (Huxley 192). John the Savage is slowly learning, to a certain level, Shakespearean Hypnopedia. John also refuses to take soma because he believes that human emotions are natural and should not be suppressed by taking drugs. John creates an uprising in the square saying, “Don't take that horrible stuff. It's poison, it's poison” (Huxley 211). Going through John the Savage’s unorthodox ways brings a clear image of what

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