Ulysses And The Sirens Poem Analysis

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Throughout the years Greek Mythology has influenced art and literature. It was created to teach people using stories about their gods. For example, the myth of the Sirens from The Odyssey teaches us to use logic to resist temptation and move forward with our lives. Ulysses, Latin for Odysseus, and his men are sailing back to their home Ithaca, when the stumble upon Sirens. They must stay strong and resist temptation so they can continue their journey. In the painting, Ulysses and The Sirens, John Williams Waterhouse uses the story of the Sirens to show that there are things in this world that will make people feel very special, but they must use logic to not fall for this temptation, while in her poem “Siren Song”, Margaret Atwood uses the same scene to show that many people want to make others feel special, but this can make it easier for them to take advantage of others.
In the poem “Siren Song”, Margaret Atwood uses imagery and diction to express the theme that many people want to make others feel special, but this can make it easier for them to take advantage of others. In the beginning of the poem the Siren describes the song as,
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When someone looks at the painting the viewer can see many things happening, including Ulysses being tied up to the mast of the ship. Recall in The Odyssey when Ulysses and his mean approach the Sirens, Ulysses tells his men to tie him to the mast of the ship, put wax in his ears, and in their ears. He does this so that he can resist the Sirens. He asks for his men to put wax in their ears so that if he pleads for them to release him, they cannot hear him and can continue with their journey. Also the viewer can see a Siren sitting in front of one of the men that is rowing. She is trying to get his attention and tempt him, but he cannot hear her because Ulysses order his men to put wax in their

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