Ulrich Zwingli And The Catholic Reformation

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“As we see it, the two characteristics run like a double rhythm through the Catholic Reformation: the preoccupation of the Catholic reformers with individual or personal reformation and their concern for the restoration and renewal of the Church’s pastoral mission. In short, Catholic reform had a marked personal and pastoral orientation” (Olin, 291). Lutheranism, the first of the Protestant movements, used The Justification by Faith as its basis which declared that one will achieve salvation by living through faith and faith alone. People who believed in Zwinglism agreed that faith should be valued in a person’s life because God obtains immense power and religious purity and simplicity should be the foundation for all Catholic churches. Calvinism …show more content…
Zwingli is known as a quiet German reformer who deepened theological question and his ideas spread to different regions within Europe during the sixteenth century. According to Zwinglism, God had immense power and looked at the world and the Roman Catholics as petty because of the sacraments they performed. “Zwingli’s reform extended and deepened some of the fundamental theological and moral concepts of Protestantism… simplifying the church building into an undecorated hall, in which a simple communion table replaced the elevated Catholic altar. He thus started on the way toward the puritanical simplicity of the later Calvinists” (Zwingli, 1484-1531, 330). Hostile to sacraments enforced by the church and in his organized church, Zwingli wanted a sense of community discipline led by religious leaders which would unite a society that obtained pure, religious …show more content…
Each founder of the protestant religions wanted to use their own individual faiths and churches to sway away from a medieval religious system to their idea of a modern one. “Protestants differed with one another, yet there was much that all had in common. All rejected the special, sacerdotal, or supernatural character of the priesthood…” (Palmer, 91). Most of the movements adopted ideas from Luther’s doctrines and The Justification by Faith. Although the movements all had contrasting motives they all strived to reform the church in some way or

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