Uganda And Côte D-AIDS Analysis

1901 Words 8 Pages
In the following essay I will compare and contrast two of the low-income sub-Saharan African cases that have been most impacted by the AIDS epidemic, Uganda and Côte d’Ivoire, in illustrating how socio-economical, political, and cultural challenges affect the countries’ capability of controlling the spread of HIV/AIDs. It is important to examine the spread of HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa, as it is the region most affected, accounting for 69% of all people living with HIV in Africa (UNAIDS, 2012). As of 2011 there were 23.5 million people living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa compared to 300,000 in the Middle East and North Africa combined (UNAIDS, 2012). The HIV death toll in Sub-Saharan Africa has caused serious economic contractions, threatened …show more content…
Uganda is an example of the importance of political leadership and commitment in addressing the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The leadership provided by President Yoweri Museveni led to openness about the epidemic and to an effective programmatic response. As a result of President Yoweri Museveni’s efforts Ugandans experienced a steady decline in adult HIV prevalence throughout the 1990s with a drop from 14 percent to 5.0 percent today (HIV/AIDS, 2001). Contrary to Uganda, in Côte d’Ivoire political leaders were silenced by religious taboos that inhibited open discussion about an epidemic that spreads mainly through sexual contact (Sachs, 2001). This combined with the lack of political stability, civil conflicts, and economic crisis that damaged access to health services lead to the government’s failure in generating an effective public sector response to HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS, …show more content…
For the purpose of this essay I will focus on the importance of health care spending and how the lack of healthcare services directly affects Africa’s gross national product (GNP). The Cost of Illness (COI) modeling indicates that each 10 percent rise in life expectancy at birth (LEB) has an economic value of roughly 30 percent per capita; 10 percent is the result of a longer earning period and 20 percent is due to longer life independent of earning power (de Waal, 2003). This means that as a result of 2.2 million Africans dying of AIDS in 1999 there was a loss of 35.1 percent in GNP (Sachs, 2001). A success for Uganda in this scenario is that the government had increased health care funding to develop the program, Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission (PMTCT) in 1999, which became the cornerstone for global policies and programs (UNAIDS, 2014). According to 2011 UN statistics, through this program 94 percent of pregnant women registered at antenatal clinics were being tested for HIV and 86 percent of these were infected mothers who then received antiretroviral treatment (ARVs) beginning during pregnancy and continuing for their life span. This early intervention significantly reduced the risk of children being born with HIV (UNAIDS, 2014). On the other hand,

Related Documents