Two Vines: Satisfaction And Lust In The Scarlet Ibis By James Hurst

946 Words 4 Pages
Two Vines: Satisfaction & Lust Love and cruelty simply don’t combine due to pride, eventually one will prevail in the end. Most come to a point where either two of those emotions show simultaneously or individually. Eventually, a person will reach a consensus to realize which sentiment is true to them. James Hurst is able to convey this in his short story. Hurst, the author of, “The Scarlet Ibis,” tells the tale of two Brothers. Brother and Doodle have quite the special relationship due to Doodle’s limitations. In addition, Doodle tries to please Brother to the best of his ability. The journey of becoming “normal” is long and painful. In the end, one clear emotion is shown through Brother. Hurst, the author of “The Scarlet Ibis,” …show more content…
The symbol of the hurricane shows a direct correlation to Brother and how his destructive manner allows pride to control him and create a film over the empathetic aspects of himself. While the family is eating dinner a home, they see the scarlet ibis in the tree. Intriguingly, all of them walk over to the mysterious bird. Making an inference based off his observations and his bird book Father says, “It lives in the tropics- South America to Florida. A storm [brings] it here” (Hurst 5). The relationship between Brother and the hurricane resembles Doodles weakness and Brothers unknowingly corrosive actions. The hurricane carries the Scarlet Ibis and causes it to be weak and fragile, barely able to move. Brother does not realize that he is pushing Doodle to his max capacity which is wearing him out to wits end. In agreement, Brother teaches Doodle how to walk at Old Woman Swamp. The two brothers go …show more content…
The symbol of the scarlet ibis represents Doodle’s grace and a little bit of Brothers underlying guilt. In the same scene as the first quote in the previous paragraph, the family goes outside to observe the scarlet ibis. As the bird dies, Brother notes, “Even death [does] not mar its grace, for it lay on the earth like a broken vase of red flowers, and we [stand] around it, [in awe] by its exotic beauty” (Hurst 5). Like the scarlet ibis, Doodle is fragile and is not being properly taken care of. Doodle matches up with birds weariness and hard time staying afloat. Unfortunately, Brother does not see that Doodle is trying his best to accomplish what he is asking him to do and is wearing him out. As the bird dies, it dies gracefully as it soon foreshadows an unpropitious event. Later on in the short story, Brother and Doodle are trying to escape the pouring rain. While this is happening, Brother begins running away from him hoping he will catch up, he does not. Brother goes back from Doodle and hovers over him. He finally realizes the extent of leaving Doodle behind. In agony Brother says, “I [begin] to weep, the tear-blurred vision in red before me [looks] very familiar. ‘Doodle!’, I screamed above the pounding storm and [throw] my body to the earth above his. For a long time, it [seems] forever, I lay there crying, sheltering my fallen scarlet ibis” (Hurst 6). Brother refers to

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